We Are Innovation because we share

We Are Innovation because we share

Innovation comes from the interaction of two concepts: an idea and a need. It is, in essence, born from sharing. This on-going discussion enables those iterations that take concepts to tangible projects, and generates the appropriate framework for ideas to develop further, without being closed on narrow points of views that eventually mislead innovation. Customer inclusion has become a key trend in developing innovation, and there now exist a wide variety of tools to develop this inclusiveness.

In her book “Work Smarter with Social Media”, Alexandra Samuel explains how the digital world is enabling a better visibility of ideas and concepts, setting guidelines to properly use each of the social networks the Internet is currently offering, and tools to optimise them for companies. As she says, “From managing email to building a social media presence, making smart use of technology is essential to professional success in a digital world. ”

A better visibility leads to better readability, hence better informed service developments. Taken on a wider scale, this has the potential to generate new breadth of ideas, developed jointly with the communities they serve. As an example, Pritpal S. Tamber writes for the Stanford Social Innovation Review that “It’s time to question the assumption that outside expertise, ideas, technology, and resources that are often alien to our communities will bring health to us. It’s time to believe that our communities have—or can nurture—what it takes to create health.” Defining concepts and solutions takes a whole different sense when the definition is being shared by a community of sense, and sense of community.

Sharing is indeed creating more links between humans, rather than simply developing businesses and markets. In his article for Forbes, Henry Doss describes what is needed to reach a more humanly oriented innovation. In his view: “if we are to really understand and harness the power of innovation in systems, we must understand that its purpose should be expressed in terms related to happiness, integrity, fulfillment, and shared responsibilities, as much as ROI, or efficiency, or patents.  Because to the degree we focus on the latter elements of innovation — the so-called business measures — we will miss absolutely the very things we need be mindful of in human systems like economies.”

Ultimately, including a human interaction into conceptual innovation enables to continually challenge status quo and adapt to changing visions and needs. When team are clearly driven by shared challenges, they are able to take them through selection hurdles until they define the appropriate solutions, understanding why they need them and therefore setting the right culture of change around them. As Torben Rick explains on his blog, “People resist change that is imposed on them. But if they help define the changes, they will own them. Whenever an organization imposes new things on people there will be difficulties. Participation, involvement and open, early, full communication are the important factors.”

It has never been a better time to reiterate how human links and interactions are necessary to better drive innovation. In a world soon dictated by data and robots, there seem to be a need to remind what nature lays behind the digits and technologies, and what objective they serve. Innovation should not stick to creating better processes and margins, it should enable a better sharing environment to come up with the right ideas and tools to develop on the long-term, eventually leading to a better world rather than a better market. As analysts and specialists mentioned above remind, it is all about sharing this sense of community and enabling communities to innovate by sharing ideas, definitions and solutions as a team, using the social tools and technologies available to do so.

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Posted in Change, Creativity, Diversity, Social Innovation, Why we are innovation

Hadoop: Structuring the future

Innovation Index - Hadoop

The Innovation Index analyses the innovation impact of a given trend or technology. Infrastructure and support is the last article of a series of three-dimensional analyses to provide a final Innovation Index for Hadoop as a supporting technology to Big Data. Two other articles estimate the market attractiveness and business model maturity of Hadoop. The infrastructure and support part reviews trends for technical readiness to market, structural readiness to market, together with their wider legal, social and economics impact.

Technical readiness to market: Hybrid models, risks and opportunities

Technical Readiness Analysis

Technical Readiness Analysis

Technology: Big Solutions for Big Problems

1. “Intel has customized some processors from the previous Xeon E7 v2 generation for Oracle database solutions, in order to meet Google, Amazon and Facebook requirements.” NoSQLCenter

2. “The objective of Google Cloud BigTable is to offer cloud space for companies and organizations willing to store great amounts of data, which could also be combined to analysis tools.” NoSQLCenter

3. “Big data technologies are capable of solving both questions when they are implemented under governance that supports new solutions.” Svetlana Sicular, Gartner

4. “But along with these cost advantages come challenges including security, data privacy, regulatory compliance, access management, and auditing that prevent companies from moving everything to the cloud. A hybrid cloud solution can address these challenges while delivering the cost savings that cloud provides. ” Data Informed

Expertise: Converging knowledges

5. “In 2011, McKinsey Global Institute warned of an upcoming shortage of “140,000 to 190,000 people with deep analytic skills” and “1.5 million managers and analysts”. Gartner estimated in 2012 that only one-third of the 4.4m IT jobs needed globally to support big data would be filled by 2015. This year, the EU said it expected upwards of a 825,000 labour shortfall by 2020.” GE Look Ahead

6. “Alas, while many developers are beginning to recognize the synergies and overlaps between BI and big data, quite a few still consider and run both in individual silos.” Boris Evelson, Forrester

7. “Gartner has recently predicted that by 2017, most business users in addition to analysts in organisations will have access to self-service business intelligence (BI) tools to prepare data for analysis.” Chloe Green, Information Age

Research and Development: Connecting to the Future

8. “With industry analysts predicting that the majority of new application deployments will be SaaS-based by 2017, the requirement of having connected data should not be negotiable. It is a must have.” Julie Lockner, Informatica

9. “Hölzle is the man who oversees Google’s worldwide network of data centers, and he believes that efficiencies brought by devices such as Internet-connected thermostats, lighting systems, and self-driving cars will balance out the extra power needed to drive our computing centers.” Ariel Zambelich, WIRE

10. “Much of what is being done with wearable devices is happening simply because it can be done. However, several users still are not sure about wearables and whether they want to walk around with devices strapped to them all day. Is this the paradox of wearables?” Rohit Yadav, Data Science Central

WAI Comment: Analysts seem to agree on the requirements of Big Data and therefore hadoop based solutions needed, as much as they agree on the potential market opportunities and threats. They question the ability of organizations to support the roll-out of such solutions given the lack of specialized resources able to build Hadoop based solutions and the difficulty they have to adapt to new governance models. Overall, the initial technical readiness to market for Hadoop reaches an average 2.5 out of 5.

Structural readiness to market: It’s all about integration

Structural Readiness Analysis

Governance models: Identifying the right targets

1. “Regardless of who creates or manages the applications of the enterprise, it is important to remember that integration is to a large degree the nervous system that connects applications into business capabilities. As such, the CIO’s team has a critical and continuing role in managing this linkage.” Myles Suer, Informatica

2. “When we see industry shifts with a new technology, the second wave of the shift comes with partnerships. Embracing new technology among partners is a nod to the validity of the solution, and definitely increases the velocity of adoption.” Eric Wright, VMTurbo

3. “Being data-driven gives you a clear competitive advantage over your competitors. You take the right decision when they don’t. You know what’s working when they don’t. You get it.” Pierre Lechelle

Mid-management : redefining responsibilities

4. “To survive and thrive in this new world, marketers need to start using data integration to devise a host of new quantifiable marketing metrics that can analyze a number of factors such as number of wins, cost per win, and the ROI earned from specific marketing campaigns.” Mark Johnson, Loyalty360

5. “Deepak Taneja, chief technologist at RSA, the security division of Hopkinton-based IT storage firm EMC (NYSE: EMC), said it’s important for startups to think about integrating cybersecurity technology into a connected device starting from the first prototype.” Sara Castellanos, Boston Business Journal

6. “Just to be clear, no enterprise, no matter how large, has all the capabilities in house to bring a complex IoT product or service to market without some outside help along the way.” Aria Systems

Operational level: Coping with change

7. “In this report, “machine generated” data projects were 41.2% of all big data projects, rising from 23.7% in 2012. This jump was at the expense of “human sourced” data dropping to 20.9%. In addition, over 40% valued big data projects as a “vital part” or “important part” of their business. This demonstrates both a jump in operational big data use-case deployments and a large share of these deployments making a significant impact on the business”. Steve Smythe, SM360

8. Refining data as a must have for data analytics and business decision quality.

9. “With more than 90% of companies reporting some level of cloud adoption, stringent security requirements are necessary to keep information private. As adoption and use increases, security will remain a top priority. Yet, keeping private information private is easier said than done. In 2014 alone, security breaches increased 27.5%.” Aria Systems

WAI Comment: The radical changes implied by Big Data and Hadoop to enterprises are such that a complete unlearning and relearning process needs to take place throughout organisations. On the governance side, companies need to redefine their visions and objectives. On the management side, they need to open the strategic thinking models. On the operational side, they need to apply change in the midst of an immature market structure and business models. The level of challenge brings the intermediate grade to 2 out of 5.

Legal, Social and Economic impact

Hadoop Legal Social and Economics Impact

Hadoop Legal Social and Economics Impact

Legal: shaping a concrete framework for Big Data

1. “Concerns over automated decision-making are sometimes raised and, certainly, automated decision processing is particularly problematic under European Union data protection law. (…)  Accordingly, employers that use big data analytics in recruitment need to ensure that there is an element of human judgment involved in decision-making.” Susan McLean, Socially Aware Blog

2. “To secure today’s critical business asset – data — companies need to implement security frameworks that account for today’s dynamic and global commercial environment. There is simply no technology fix for the “where” of data security.” Diane D Reynolds, Privacy and Data Security Insight

3. “On Wednesday, April 8, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) entered a consent decree and levied a $25 million civil penalty against AT&T to settle a data breach that exposed the information of nearly 280,000 customers. “Alexander Stout, JDSupra

Social: unanswered uncertainties

4. “And because each solution must have its own ecosystem, there are no synergies that can be leveraged to bring down costs. When you combine fractured experiences with higher costs, it’s not long before people give up and go back to the old way of doing things or try yet another solution only to become even more frustrated.” Dave Evans, TechCrunch

5. “This is exactly where doors will open to capture and use all this necessary information to later be able to implement a smart city.” No SQL Center

6. “Big Data has a tremendously positive potential, but just because of the catastrophes which could result from a Big Data breach – whether accidental or not –  it can create create much serious issues.” Jose Manuel Abad Linan, El Pais

7. “Encourage the habit of refining questions and relooking at questionable decisions. Never settle for easy answers and do not let your analytics group become an answering machine.” Kshira Saagar, Information Management 

Economics: a potential to be refined

8. “Around 30% of companies within the financial sector in Spain are using the opportunities offered by (Big Data and analytics) technologies to grow innovation.” No SQL Center

9. “I do agree that, leveraged properly, there’s much more value to be extracted from the cloud by government. Further, I agree that cloud technologies have sufficiently matured to the point that it is feasible to consider migrating mission critical applications. Yet, is it possible that the government’s “fear of commitment” is, in some ways, justified ?” Bobby Caudill, Informatica

10. “But enterprises should beware as the definition of “policy” varies wildly. Some say it’s the ability to control the resources apps’ use or where the apps run. Others view policy as governing the permissions and delivering security. Policy is all of that and more.” Pat Romansky, CloudExpo Blog

WAI Comment: External players supporting Big Data and Hadoop markets are taking a stance on opportunities. Although still under definition for the greatest part, the legal framework is starting to take action and protect end-users. Analysts ring alarms against the lack of clarity and common definitions of Big Data consequences (whether positive or negative). Finally, innovation specialists highlight the application potential that lays beyond the many doubts we will surely find innovative answers to. Still, the overall Infrastructure and Support impact for Hadoop hits a final grade of 2 out of 5.

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Posted in Big Data, Digital Economy, Innovation Index, IT Innovation, Management

ThinkL@b status : “not on sleep mode”

Think L@b

The ThinkL@b welcomes a new joiner today. Click on the image below to meet WAIbot.

Welcome WAIbot

Welcome WAIbot

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Posted in Diversity, Think L@b

One step further at a time: Society and Technology

One step further at a time

The Big Picture is a monthly PESTLE analysis taking you through key innovation trends for Society and Technology. You can find our first article on Politics and Economics here.

Society: defining new models

New ModelsThere is no debate on the fact that our societies need to change. They are changing. They need more inclusiveness, they need more open-mindedness, they need more social good. There are debates on the who, and the how. This debate is fair, and needs to take place. Starting an open-minded society is taking a closer look at “who” expresses needs, and “how” they are being expressed.

It may come families. Fathers, for examples, in search of a new balance with an (righteously) demanding feminine counterpart. How do we define new roles ? Jennifer Senior, from Science of Us, explains how “fathers who take paternity leave are far more likely to assume more household responsibilities further down the road, thereby helping to diminish the possibility of future marital strife”.  They are not the only ones asking for new roles. Young ladies are also redefining their impact in the science world and getting engaged for more recognition. As Rachel Swaby writes for Fast CoExist, “By treating women in science like scientists instead of anomalies or wives who moonlight in the lab as well as correcting the cues given to girls at a young age about what they’re good at and what they’re supposed to like, we can accelerate the growth of an entire new generation of chemists, archeologists, and cardiologists while also revealing a whole hidden history of the world.”

Driving change necessitates management tools, even on a society scale. Erin Mayer, from the Harvard Business Review, explains how she maps management styles across different cultures to anticipate potential conflicts in global teams.

Map Out Cultural Conflicts on Your Team – Erin Mayer – Harvard Business Review

The point is not to relate to the exact findings which may actually vary from industry to industry, company to company, individual to individual. The point is to ask: what will specific audiences expect, how will they react, what would they need in a given situation, with other sets of people? How can we generate value from combining all theses audiences together ? The point is to anticipate and better drive change, for there are many social changes coming ahead. Starting again with families and technology. As Alexandra Sifferlin points out in TIME, “A better understanding of the use of mobile media in young children and how it varies by population groups is critical to help develop educational strategies for both parents and health providers.”

Millenials are also challenging existing social models by aspiring for more entrepreneurship and independence. In her article for Fast CoExist, Ariel Schwartz explains how “Generation Z has no illusions about staying in comfy corporate jobs. Over four in ten respondents think they’ll work for themselves in their careers (that is, according to the U.S. Census, more than four times higher than the actual percentage of people who work for themselves). Some 63% of respondents also think that entrepreneurship should be taught in college.” It is about challenging existing rules, and some schools are developing educational programs to build individual able to challenge status quo. As Brian Foglia found out for Medium, “Instruction and “guided” experiences inhibit the natural learning processes of many children and introduce negative thought patterns. There is mounting evidence that non-intervention is extremely important in allowing children to learn, hence the importance of alternative learning environments.”

Meanwhile, some old and long predicted challenges remain. In her article for TIME, Eliza Gray reminds how “Though the problem of falling birthrates and aging population is particularly acute in Japan, a similar problem is also brewing in Europe and the U.S. The federal government’s data from late last year showed that 2013 birthrates hit a record low in the U.S. in 2013, down 9% from a high in 2007, as American women delay having children.” Yet some old and long predicted answers exist. In an interview given to Christophe Bys from Usine Digitale, Laurence Parisot, former head of MEDEF (French entrepreneurs network), states that “the digital transformation (of our economies) holds an enthusiastic and hopeful dimension. It accelerates changes in management models for generations and individuals with economical and political impact.”

Technology: knowingly racing to the unknown ?

A race to the unknownAs an opening question, Meera Chary and Kristofer Keefe explore the different strategies to make sure products we develop actually solve problems. As they explain, it starts with defining the right problem with the beneficiaries, trial, fail, re-iterate until defining the right solution. As they mention in their article from Fast CoExist, “In the world of technology for social good, such rapid prototyping creates a cycle of learning and continuous improvement that keeps up with changing business approaches and markets.”

This picture from The Next Web shows a certain number of product iterations that have led to the connected devices we hold with us a on daily basis.

For sure, drawing timelines on our ideas and realizations help understand what has become critical over the time. In the midst of a growing call for environmental-friendly technologies, innovation has gone green. As Kevin McSpadden explains in his article from TIME, “An Audi research facility in Dresden, Germany, has managed to create the first batches of diesel fuel with a net-zero carbon footprint — made from carbon dioxide (CO2), water and renewable energy sources such as wind or solar power.” For his part, Matt McFarland thinks golf cars will disrupt the auto industry. Why ? Because, as he describes in his article for The Washington Post, “Given their limited features, these low-speed vehicles aren’t classified as cars by the Chinese government. So the low-speed vehicles are exempted from the expensive licensing fees to make a car street legal. This is another advantage. Dodging regulations is a classic move of successful innovations.” As Sameer Bathia writes for tech.co, companies understood they had to break some rules and create new basics. “Companies are adopting socially enabled business processes “to create engaged and empowered organizations—teams that seamlessly work across traditional and organizational lines with an eye towards unleashing more talent, innovation, and efficiency across the enterprise.” On the science and technology side, this is what can happen when knowledge crosses new lines:

Science keeps having us think we can go further, in so many dimensions at a time.

On the business side, it seems technology has reached a no return point as well. In the Journal du Net, Claude Molly-Mitton wonders: “After years on digital revolutions, what will our digitalized world look like in 2025 ? What place will hold information systems and computing systems in this new paradigm ? More specifically, what will be their architecture type in 2025 and supporting business models ?”.  For sure, a lot of people would like to know. As Pauline Cantener explains for l’Atelier, “Roland Berger estimates that if the European industrial sector misses its digital transformation, it would loose more than 605 billions euros by 2025″.

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Posted in Change, Education, Society and Technology, The Big Picture

Innovate In 2015: Schools, Politics and Society

Innovate in 2015

Innotrends take you through diverse innovation segments’ views on Innovation in 2015. This article analyses Business Schools, Universities, Politics and Public Institutions, Customers and Influencers messages shared on WAI networks around innovation changes this year. A later article will investigate innovation from experts, business consultancy and market analysis, press and medias point of views. This will conclude the Innovate in 2015 series, starting with this first analysis on science, business and technology experts views on innovation.

Business Schools and Universities: challenging barriers

Schools and InstitutesFor London Business School, a first challenge lays in the way we interact with each other. In following video, Kamalini Ramdas explains how we can change our interactions to better create actions through them. She nicely explains how lowering fences in neighborhoods could encourage more collaborative lifestyles and draws a similar pattern to create new interactions, new ideas in organisations.

Lexmark also wants to encourage young children to learn differently. The company supports STEM activities for schools, which cover initiatives such as LEGO inspired engineering classes, “to explore imaginative worlds that kids already know and love, such as Star Wars or Minecraft, to teach core engineering principles while using LEGOs.”

Of course, children cannot rebuild the whole world on their own. Other types of schools are engaging into a more collaborative, smart world. One example of them is IESE Business School who has recently launched a strategic smart city center together with UNECE. There indeed seem to be a strong will to encourage knowledge sharing across borders, any kind of border, among schools (any kind of school). Olivier Ladoux from Nantes University in France relates in Le Monde how “transdisciplinarity is the university of the 21st Century’.

Politics and Public Institutions: is willingness enough ?

Politics and Public InstitutionsOn March 22nd, the international day dedicated to women, The Economist shared an interesting video about Japanese Prime Minister’s choice to increase feminine ratio in leadership positions in order to boost the economy.

It seems an emergency to break former rules has emerged. As Ian Bremmer from Strategy & Business explains, “The old geopolitical model is breaking down, but the only thing emerging in its place is crisis.” He later explains how China could potentially take the lead in proposing breakthrough solutions for global issues. Jeff Chidester reminds in the Stanford Social Innovation Review that there are existing tools to start financing change. What they need is political will to move forward. As the author writes, “As Capitol Hill braces for another budget battle, you can expect to hear both sides bloviate about their plans to expand economic growth and create middle-class jobs. Fortunately, a multitude of solutions exist outside the theater of Washington brinksmanship. If policymakers want to move beyond the rhetoric, PRIs are a good place to start.

Some politics are starting to show willingness to change. London, for example, has recently proposed to radically transform the face of the city, offering it more to pedestrians. As Ben Schiller from Fast Co-Exist explains, “As it looks to become a prettier, greener city, London wants to put some of its more unsightly features where the world can’t see them: underground.”

Customers and Influencers: experience as an expectation

Customers and InfluencersWould leaving more space to humans lead to creating a more humanly world ? This question also raises the point of equality. Starting with gender one. The Stanford Social Innovation Review also re-issued a series of article for the international day for women. One of them, by Jackie VanderBrug and Sarah Kaplan, explains “how companies can increase women’s access to capital, promote workplace equity, and create products and services that improve the lives of women and girls.”

A more humanly world would also necessitate to engage younger generations. As Marie-Caroline Missir explains in L’etudiant, students in business and engineering schools have new expectations towards their potential employers. “Although they still seek interesting missions, graduates are now equally demanding on engagement in terms of corporate and social responsibility, ethics and image supported by companies for which they will potentially work“.

We indeed may not be interested in superficial engagement and activities. We may need to be engaged from farther, deeper rooted beliefs and core values. In this, the economic system as existing today is not helpful. In The Washington Post, Dominic Basulto finds that “the reason why we’re seeing smartwatches being marketed as fashion items is because everyone suspects, deep down, that the new smartwatches may not have enough breakthrough functionality on their own to make them attractive to users.”

At the end of the day, it seems users are not looking for an image. They demand the entire experience. That’s the reason why Manu Panda reminds on The Innovation Enterprise that by leveraging big data, we can re-create a better customer experience. In his own words : “We can measure and therefore manage more precisely.  We can make better predictions on customer behavior and better estimate  demand of good and services.  We can target more effective interventions in areas that historically relied on gut and intuition.”

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Posted in Change, Education, InnoTrends

Leading through change, politics and economics

Politics and Economics

The Big Picture is a PESTLE analysis taking you through the broader environment around innovation. Today, we cover Politics and Economics.

Politics : Looking for heroes

Looking for Heroes In an article from La Tribune, we interestingly learn that France is the first European nation in terms of start-up creation. As Delphine Cuny explains, French minister of economy stated that “we need to define a European digital strategy, unifying rules”. That may indeed be welcome, especially as on the other side of the Channel, Ofcom starts to plan IoT support. As Warwick Ashford explains for Computer Weekly, “Ofcom has pledged to work with the government, the information commissioner’s office, other regulators and industry to support the progress of IoT nationally and internationally.”

Innovation and technology hold other kinds of influence over politics. As Severin Carrell from The Guardian mentions, “Analysing live data on Google searches for the name Alex Salmond combined with commercial polling figures allowed the researchers to predict the yes vote would hit 45% – five days before that actual result in the referendum on 18 September.” Predictions on the one hand, uncertainties on the other hand. Ingrid Lunden writes in TechCrunch that “Still, at a time when companies like Google are getting scrutinized on other regulatory fronts and subsequently challenged in the public eye, a Google Tax will not be welcomed.”

Will innovation and technology ever help solving real political issues ? We can at least hope there is an intent. For the political issues are real, and they need more than predictable solutions. As AFP reminds in La Gazette des Communes, in France “discriminations slow down the economic integration of immigrants’ descendants, especially those from Africa.” On the other side of the Atlantic ocean, George Friedman reminds in Stratfor : “So a speech will be made. Obama and Netanyahu are supposed to dislike each other. Politicians are going to be elected and jockey for power. All of this is true, and none of it matters. What does matter is that the United States, regardless of who is president, has to develop a new strategy in the region.”

Economics : going round in circles

Going round in circlesThe New York Times shares a 3D view of the global economic situation, with an analysis of “The Yield Curve”. The outlook doesn’t look bright, especially in 3-D. As Jonathan Gebauer explains for The Social MS, “Startups get founded everywhere – but the money to start up simply isn’t available.” May be it is high time we explore new dimensions ? As Hitachi reminds, “The McKinsey Institute has calculated that shifting towards a circular economy could add $1 trillion to the global economy by 2025 and create 100,000 new jobs within the next five years – a significant reward for creating less ‘waste’ during work.” Kathryn Dill from Forbes interviewed Ben Parr, the author of “Captivology”. In his own words, “It’s not about capturing attention for just yourself, it’s about capturing attention for the great ideas, the great art, the great projects that you have. Everybody has some passion more people should see or notice.” More ideas, more money ? It depends on how we manage to structure the “more”. As Parag Khanna writes in Longitudes about the sharing economy, “these online platforms empower individuals, reduce transaction costs, and create a more inclusive economy. But their evolution is far from straightforward, and many such services will require careful regulation if they are to flourish – as protests and court rulings in Europe against Uber demonstrate.”

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Posted in Change, Digital Economy, Diversity, Politics and Economics, Social Innovation, The Big Picture

Hadoop: finding the right balance

Innovation Index - Hadoop

The Innovation Index analyses the market attractiveness, business model maturity and infrastructure and support impact of a given sector or technology. This is the second part of the new Innovation Index for Hadoop. It aims at analyzing Hadoop business model maturity. The first part of the analysis, covering market attractiveness, is available here. A last article will weigh the impact of infrastructure and support impact on Hadoop.

End-to-end model Analysis: off the ground.

Off The Ground

Off The Ground

1. “Tech-savvy individuals with bad intentions can manipulate people through big data, and foreign governments — including Russia, China, and North Korea — have notoriously used it to control their populations”. – Daniel Riedel, Wired

2. “While 34% of the respondents agree that analyzing data from diverse sources is the key issue driving them to consider Big Data, a mere 3% rate the analytical capabilities in their organization as world-class”. Shilpa Phnadis, Times of India

3. “Whilst I’m sure many will create efficiencies and perhaps build out some new services to stay ahead, history tells us, and my instinct says, that many are going to be knocked by new innovative business models that spring up around them.” – Derek du Preez, Diginomica

4. “while more than half of HR practitioners feel confident about using data and metrics to improve their department’s effectiveness, fewer than half said that they were able to draw insights from this data and communicate this to other people in the business.” Cath Everett, Personnel Today

5. “Amazon got there first with a commercial offering of MapReduce, and it has hosted millions of clusters since then, and is likely to expand its partnerships with distribution vendors beyond the already promising one with MapR”. – Merv Adrian, Gartner

6. “Generating immediate revenue from Big Data is a universal goal for most marketers – and DaaS makes this possible for businesses across any type of industry.” Larissa Bedgood, Smart Data Collective

7. “Opening up the API for Watson allows developers and IBM to work together to create a Watson ecosystem. This will give developers and clients access to build any app they want.” Chris Ciaccia, The Street

8. “Formulating a viable strategy and developing IoT solutions can be highly complex.” Justin Browne, GovTech

9. “Offering an interface which allows users to obtain and configure capacity, this allows for complete control over computing resources. The user can scroll capacity up and down as their computing requirements change and Amazon EC2 is offered on a pay as you use basis, only charging the user for the capacity that is used.” James Nunns, CBR Online

10. “70% of large organizations already purchase external data and 100% will do so by 2019 (…) Companies will double their investment in generating new and unique data.” Gil Press, Forbes

The problem of Hadoop supporting big data turns out to be its own solution. This universe of unknowns long to be analyzed and synchronized in business analytics strategies that disrupt beyond the vertical and horizontal models established so far. As a consequence, most actors currently positioned in selling and/or developing Hadoop based services have opted for an open and flexible strategy to market and supporting business models (open innovation and partnerships). Although at early stage, this tends to consolidate and normalise disruption as a way forward, which leaves a great part of uncertainty but shows players are addressing it positively. A shift in mindset ? That may well be. But that’s only a start. The current maturity of end-to-end business models for Hadoop is estimated at 2 out of 5.

Strategic initiatives impact : data on the table.

Strategic Initiatives Impact

Strategic Initiatives Impact

1. “A team of researchers from Stanford University and Google have released a paper highlighting a deep learning approach they say shows promise in the field of drug discovery.” GigaOm

2. “The Palo Alto-based company says the new certifications are aimed at accelerating Hadoop adoption in the enterprise – which is obviously where Hortonworks is focused in terms of future growth – by supporting key capabilities required of an enterprise data platform.” Natalie Gagliordi, ZDNet

3. “We can target more effective interventions in areas that historically relied on gut and intuition.  At the same time, they present an enormous challenge on how to exploit those to improve a company’s performance.” Manu Panga, Innovation Enterprise

4. ” Data Science is used to leverage eBay’s powerful infrastructure, services and massive amounts of commerce data, while protecting the privacy of eBay’s customers.” Vadim Kutsyy, Innovation Enterprise

5.”Much like its Hadoop counterparts, namely Hortonworks and Cloudera, MapR’s portfolio focuses on the enterprise. What sets MapR apart, however, is its range of proprietary features tailored to specific industries such as financial services, healthcare and telecommunications.” Natalie Gagliordi, ZDNet

6. “Surrounding their de facto Big Data leader — both metaphorically and otherwise — the forces of Hortonworks, Teradata, SAS, and IBM announced the Open Data Platform, a consortium of sponsors (gold and platinum) who will rally around a “core” offering of Hadoop.” Eric Kavanagh, LinkedIn

7. “Looking forward, IBM plans to spend $4 billion to invest in the new areas of focus like data analytics and cloud computing, excluding acquisitions.” Syndication, CIO today

8. “Data is a strategy – and we need to start thinking about it as one. It should adhere to the same competitive standards as other business strategies. Data monopolists’ ability to block competitors from entering the market is not markedly different from that of the oil monopolist Standard Oil or the railroad monopolist Northern Securities Company.” Kira Radinsky, HBR Blog

9. “The Apache HBase community has released Apache HBase 1.0.0. Seven years in the making, it marks a major milestone in the Apache HBase project’s development, offers some exciting features and new API’s without sacrificing stability, and is both on-wire and on-disk compatible with HBase 0.98.x.” Eniz Soztutar, HortonWorks

10. “SAP Predictive Analytics is designed to help bridge the skills gap by placing complex predictive capabilities in the hands of many more users.” Katherine Noize, Computer World

The intensity of Hadoop related articles is representative of the numerous initiatives and different approaches for players to position themselves on the Big Data chess board. As mentioned above, the key point to bear in mind is the disruptive impact of Hadoop related activities, breaking up the value chains and  putting usage, therefore humans, at the center of it. The scale of the opportunity is also reflected in the depth of the analysis brought up by specialists. They talk about saving the world, they talk about ending it. Economists foresee drastic changes, businesses dream about unlimited opportunities. This dynamic brings the intermediate Business Model Maturity rate to 3.5 out of 5. 

The Business Case : all in ?

Business Case Impact

1. “Big data is fast becoming the hottest commodity in a contemporary gold rush, with anticipated global growth at a rate of 40% per year and businesses seeking new and innovative ways to commercialise it in their quest for competitive advantage.” Richard Blatchly, Shoosmiths

2. “It is estimated that 2.2 million terabytes of new data is created every day. To put this into perspective, that is roughly 128 million times more than the capacity of the average smart phone in your pocket!” Richard Blatchly, Shoosmiths

3. “the global hadoop market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 58.2% between 2013 and 2020. The market revenue was estimated to be $2.0 billion in 2013 and is expected to grow to $50.2 billion by 2020. Increase in demand for big data analytics is the major driver for this market.” Allied Market Research

4. ” Currently, services market is dominating with a market share of about 50% of the global Hadoop market due to growing necessity of data analysis in various organizations.” Allied Market Research

5. “In 2013, application software had generated the highest revenue of the overall global Hadoop software market. The main reason for this is the use of application software by developers to build applications for data analysis. Hadoop packaged software market is expect to grow at a CAGR of 62.9% during the forecast period.” Allied Market Research

6. “Looking at Oracle’s new license revenue makes this clear. For years the company’s new license revenue has hovered around 37% of total revenue.” Matt Asay, Tech Republic

7. “Analysts forecast the Global Hadoop-as-a-Service (HDaaS) market to grow at a CAGR of 84.81% over the period 2014-2019.” ReportsnReports, PRNewswire

8. “Over one third (37.8 percent) of US businesses have already invested in big data, ahead of Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA), which is at 26.8 percent; APAC, which is on 25.6 percent; and Latin America, which is at a distant fourth, with 17.8 percent.” Angus Mcaskill, ZDNet

9. “Industries furthest down the investment path are media and communications (35 percent have invested), banking (34 percent), and services (32 percent), while government (16 percent) and utilities (17 percent) are laggards.” Angus Mcaskill, ZDNet

10. “Expedia did not say how much its clusters would cost, however in 2013 the company told ComputerworldUK that the business spent over $500 million (£309 million) a year on its in-house technology.” Margi Murphy, Computer World UK

The business case for Hadoop is supporting the generally enthusiastic dynamics generated by the technology while reflecting some uncertainties surrounding business models. With massive yet segmented investments, businesses and investors are showing a candid interest in developing further Hadoop based services. With the rising opportunity of creating self-developed applications and services, to be used either or both internally and externally, a few question marks remain on the actual opportunity that could be shared on the value chain. The potential to market is so far too uncertain to bring further interest, therefore investments, into the play. The Business Case Impact for Hadoop brings the final Business Model Maturity rate to 3.3 out of 5.

 

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