On The Go: “The Hungover Generation” – Raphaël Glucksmann

Better Ideas

On the go is your innovation story inspired from elsewhere.

Raphaël Glucksmann, a French author, recently gave an interview to La Nouvelle Edition. In lights of the many social and ideological turmoils his generation is going through, he explains what, in his point of view, is the key missing element in our lost battle against reactionaries. The writer argues that we actually miss ideas. Beyond the fact that we can agree or disagree on political statements, the author is astoundingly, almost bluntly describing the extremely painful and emotive context that has led to dramatic terrorists attacks in Paris on January 7th and the following days at Charlie Hebdo and in a casher store. With a distant yet pragmatic speech, he points to facts, rings alarms, describes the ideological mechanisms that have led the extreme right, among other, to win on the ideas ground. With a technical tone and a hopeful conniving gaze, he draws the mostly probable pessimistic future ahead of us. His statement for the present is difficult. We have failed. The darkest sides of our human ideas are winning the race on the political and cultural sides. His statement for the future is simple. We need to fight back. We need to fight with ideas, new ideas, new speech. It’s time to be constructive, it’s time to accept failure. It’s time to move on.

His book, “Génération gueule de bois“, is a proposal to create a common speech through the analysis of a generation that despite social, economic and cultural differences, is eager to innovate with ideas. As the author says, “the only issue we have is that our silent marches are still too speechless. What raised on January 11th is going to collapse if we remain unable to put words into our ideas.” He is asking for a new ideology to follow the citizen momentum generated by Paris terrorist attacks. It’s all about finding words to define it. His speech is a vivid request for the rise of new patterns of thinking that unite us. Regardless of the various cultural and social backgrounds we all evolve in, we cannot let anti-cultural and closed mindedness win the debate so easily.

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Posted in Change, Diversity, On the go, Why we are innovation

Data O’Clock

WAI Data OClock

Wearables and connected devices are the primary signs of an emerging connected culture which is developing massively across the globe. The stake is two-folded: the network and services part which allows an infinite upsell opportunities with the rise of dedicated applications, and the device part which opens ways for cross-sell and development of accessories. In the end, it all sounds like a known story. Haven’t we done the same with any other device, service or network?

Reality CheckSome claim wearables bring us closer to reality. As Christoph Mims from Nasdaq mentions, “The result, based on what I’ve seen, is technology that allows you to both communicate with and consume not merely the Web, but physical space.” Rian Mcaskill from mHealthIntelligence details Millenials close links to connected devices, and highlights: “millennials prefer to engage with their doctors through the latest technology. The study found that 60 percent of millennials support the use of telehealth options and 71 percent would like their doctor to use a mobile application.” Unfortunately, as Todd R. Weiss explains for eWeek, “When the Apple Watch hits the consumer market in April, the smartwatch will be missing previously touted key health-monitoring features due to problems getting the features to work and potential regulatory issues.” Our habits are getting mobile, but is the rest of the system following ?

RequirementsThere seem to be an exhaustive list of “No”. “There is a strong need for better education of developers and healthcare professionals on developing models of care that utilize the technology effectively,” mentions Katie Wike, for HealthIToutcomes. Ewan Spence from Forbes reminds another key buying crier for wearables: “Yes it will perform many of the same functions as the currently available smartwatches and fitness trackers in the $100-$200 price bracket, but in the same way that any Italian sports car can be used to pop down to the 7-11 for some more Irn-Bru to drink, the point of the Apple Watch is not necessarily about function. It’s about fashion.”

Risks

Risks

Truth is we do seem to be unprepared. Or at least underprepared for the data waves coming ahead. That may be because we forgot an important step with regards to wearables. As Kevin C. Tofel explains on GigaOm, “I’m not sure we’re any closer to knowing what we want from these wearable devices though, or rather if we’re at a point where smartwatches are compelling enough to generate hundreds of millions of sales. That’s partly why I wasn’t surprised to see reports of only 720,000 Android Wear devices shipped in 2014. There are other reasons of course: the first devices only started shipping in the middle of the year and the platform is brand new. But I think the central stumbling block to sales is convincing people that a smartwatch is worth buying.” On the other hand, we cannot deny wearables offer a wide opportunity for innovation, including for health services, as shows EyeMitra, a new health project lead by the MIT Lab.

Opportunities

Opportunities

Companies and industries are for sure placing bets and getting ready for the race. As Agence EP outlines on ZDNet, “Canonical (the editor of Ubuntu) has recently signed an agreement with Amazon and Microsoft enabling both Internet giants to publish more APIs for Ubuntu core.” According to Geoffray from ARUCO “Allianz France is launching an incubator programme dedicated to Big Data and connected devices”. “To take off in the long term, smart watches (or any other wearable) will have to provide a truly unique user experience, one that does more than just complement or replicate what’s already available on smartphones. This is the challenge for the wearables category as a whole right now”, remind Chris Vollmer and Matt Egol on Forbes.

There are reasons to be enthusiastic about the rise of wearables and connected devices. They for sure enable a simpler use of existing mobile technologies, while enabling a greater customization of usage, services developed in closer conjunctions with wearers’ needs. The only condition to that is making sure wearables receive and transmit information knowingly and purposely shared by consumers to transparent operators and service providers so consumers can retrieve value and benefits. Chances are we are building the model the other way around. 

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Posted in Big Data, Digital Economy, Market Roadmap

On the go : The world is WAI

We Are Innovation

Last year, you all have been an amazing source of inspiration. I’d like to hereby thank you all for that. There is no greatest reward for me than this WordPress picture showing views of this blog by country (over 2014):

The World is WAI

The World is WAI

I feel grateful for the energy we represent as one world to challenge all the many obstacles that surround us today to create better tomorrows. Innovation and ideas know no barriers or frontiers. Let’s make sure they hold a common belief that we can deliver a better world for generations to come.

You are Innovation, and thank you.

JRC

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Posted in Diversity, On the go, Why we are innovation

Innovate in 2015

WAI2015

Now a couple of months away from 2014, it’s time to have a look at what innovation is promised to be this year. This InnoTrends is relating science, business and technology experts view on innovation for 2015. A later article will look into schools, politics and society views. A last one will analyse press, consulting and analysis, innovation experts views for 2015.

Business Experts and Professional CommunitiesFalling in love with Big Data ?

On the Informatica blog, Murthy Mathiprakasam explains how “There’s a lot of talk about big data in the tech industry, but there isn’t a lot of understanding of how big data actually affects the real world“. As predicted for a now rather long time, the consumerisation of connected devices is altering human interactions. And it’s only just a start. Nick Sinai from Medium describes 2015 as the year of Chief Data Officers. As JOHN GREENOUGH explains for The Business Insider, “Now, the internet is expanding again — coming to all of the everyday devices found in our homes, businesses, and cities”. From a business point of view, this encourages SIMON GROS from Siècle Digital to explain how new business models will emerge from changing needs and priorities led by collaboration in 2015. And there is a crying need for change. Dana Sanchez from AFK Insider interviewed Harvey, CEO of PayGate from South African. Harvey says: “The sluggish job market in traditional corporates is driving a lot of young people to start their own businesses.” The good news is we are given a new set of tools to create solutions. And the people with it. Omar Akhtar from Altimeter Group mentions how “Facebook is comparable to a living room, with all your friends and relatives sitting in it, while YouTube is the public town square.”

 Science and Technology ExpertsA larger discussion going on

As Gartner mentions, ” about one in five vehicles on the road worldwide will have some form of wireless network connection by 2020, amounting to more than 250 million connected vehicles”. As Paul Miller from Gigaom remarks, “The adoption of cloud computing remains in a relatively early stage, and customers are keeping their options open“. As part of the 25 technologies trends that will affect 2015, Brian Solis mentions on Linkedin :”Crowd capitalization accelerates disruption…everywhere”. Nicole Miskelly writes for Bobsguide that “2015 may also be the year that biometrics are more widely used.” Gartner also highlights a high growth in mobile usage in 2015, with mobile data rising by 59 % over the year. Hence new analytics trends impacting big data as a science as shared by Thor Olavsrud from CiteWorld :

Companies

The challenge ahead

Presenting French start-ups from the CES in La Vegas, Roxanne Gintz from L’ADN straights that  smaller, smarter, faster might be better for 2015. Better, and more beautiful ? Lindsay Kolowich from HubSpot has identified new graphic trends for visual content in 2015. If not more beautiful, why not more sensible ? Gerry Roman from Marketing Think claims that “Companies need to think about how to leverage their thought leadership by separating it into multiple formats like video, LinkedIn posts, blogs and infographics – to win at the social selling, social business or content marketing.” Mike 2.0 from Smart Data Collective explains how: “MSPs need to craft a roadmap, something that will guide them through every step in the process. This isn’t just common sense; it saves on plenty of time and resources the further into the strategy you go.” Maybe 2015 should also be a year of common sense ? Including when it requires to challenge existing rules, call them 2014 rules. As Carol Wilson from The New IP suggests: “We have repeatedly heard how network operators want to break down the traditional silos that exist within their organizations and develop more horizontal structures. The dev-ops model represents one way of doing that, while also enabling new services to come to market more quickly and new iterations of those services to be continually in development. Most operators already aspire to this approach but 2015 will be the year they begin to put it into motion.”

Business experts are already working towards developing new models and tools to enable a faster change. Science and Technology experts see this new year as eventful is terms of disruptive usage, technologies, raising expectations. Companies measure the challenge from an infrastructure, structure and systemic network point of views. If not a year of disruptive change, 2015 is for sure widely seen as a year of great hope. 

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Posted in IT Innovation, InnoTrends, Change, Big Data

We Are Innovation because we are real

Because we are real

Wondering in my new job and getting across new sources of innovation, it occurred to me how the innovation thoughts and speeches remain far from the hard facts of reality we all evolve in. I met some of my former co-workers and talked about big data. I also spent some time investigating the spread of big data in leading companies, talking to sales and consulting experts. They don’t hear big data in their day to day lives. They read it on news and marketing collaterals. What they face is big needs for simplicity, cost efficiency, and a greater connection to reality.

There has to be an ideal, though. I’ve often worked in these teams focused on ideals. And we’re asked to take a step back from reality so we can concentrate on building bridges between reality and ideal. I know we sound “marketing”. We’d take a customer need, analyse it from a market point of view, understand the impact on strategy, and launch a thousand programmes (I a am merely exaggerating) to finally support half a dozen projects that would give birth to one product launch, hopefully answering that market need. In the meantime, we’d have calculated the full EBITDA business case bringing us margin and delivering value to shareholders. We’d have set up processes to validate appetite to market. We’d have raised awareness and brought customers, people and their needs, on board. In the end, we define a complex equation that aims at creating efficient solutions for a market, which you can call customer, segment, pilot, stake holder… In the end, we are marketing.

Where do we draw a line between marketing, reality and innovation ? Maybe there doesn’t need to be any. If we’re all standing in one equation to answer needs, we’re not talking about linear, single dimension built type of solutions. We’re talking about real algorithms that alter reality by aggregating ideal and real facts to create the adequate solution. This isn’t answering a process, a shareholder, a customer, a partner need. This is answering all these needs and more. To me it sounds like a complex number definition : they have a real part and an imaginary part. We need to make sure the innovation work we develop is in deep relation with real need. A need that evolves, that is difficult to narrow down, that may be expressed in a thousand different ways. A human need.

Answers do not come out of the blue or out of business cases. They are are deeply anchored in the reality we face on a daily basis. “The marketing team talks innovation but my customer has no clue what they mean”. This is the type of daily reality we evolve in. Big Data should be used to close that gap, and not widen it. Innovation should be used to close that gap, and not widen it. The only way we have to humanize innovation is to develop it closer to its real roots, and make sure the innovation we talk about relates to a humanly expressed need.

We Are Innovation because we are Real

We Are Innovation because we are Real

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Posted in Change, Management, Why we are innovation

“I am Charlie”

Charlie

WAI is saddened by the loss of several of the most brilliantly virulent French spirits. This blog firmly believes in freedom of speech. There are no words to tell the horror and shock. We follow the entire French nation in uniting behind Charlie Hebdo.

We Are Charlie

Posted in Uncategorized

Hadoop: On the rise, but how high?

Innovation Index - Hadoop

The Innovation Index analyses the market attractiveness, business model maturity and infrastructure and support impact of a given sector or technology. This is the first part of the new Innovation Index for Hadoop. It aims at analyzing Hadoop market attractiveness through facts, figures and key words analysis, as collected through WAI networks. The second part will evaluate infrastructure and support impact, and the last part will analyze business model maturity to come to a final index value. To know more, your can watch “The Internet of Things, of What, Exactly?“, an end-to-end Innovation Index from earlier this year.

Hard Facts Analysis: Hadoop between fiction and reality

Below is a pull-push fact analysis based on articles collected through WAI networks from September 2014 to October 2014. It is based on a relative weight analysis in context, and relates to facts as listed below the graph, with no specific order.

Hard Facts Analysis

Hard Facts Analysis

  1. Nick Bostrom, Live Science: Super Intelligence is a scary scenario for many users
  2. Derick Harris, GigaOm: NortonWorks develops purpose-built object store for Hadoop, developing its connectivity.
  3. Joe Panettieri, Information Management: Tata Communications, Horizons Ventures and Access Industries invest in Watson competitor
  4. YEVGENIY SVERDLIK, Data Centre Knowledge: Germany and Japan eyed by Data Centre real-estate giant Digital Realty
  5. Richi Jennings, Forbes: Cloud is primarily business driven value, with a technology flavor
  6. Todd Goldman, Informatica: Hadoop is reaching market critical mass
  7. Steven Saslow, Information Technology Group: Business people still have no idea what cloud means
  8. Lee Gomes, IEEE Spectrum: “The overeager adoption of big data is likely to result in catastrophes of analysis comparable to a national epidemic of collapsing bridges.”
  9. Mike Combs, Veristorm: “Customer-centric marketing practices will drive everything from how promotions are constructed to how stores are stocked, decorated, and sited.”

Conclusion: The initial grade reflects the overall uncertainty related to such a wide topic and market opportunity for Hadoop, as a core environment for Big Data. The fact that we hear “fearful” voices enlightens the earliness of the market, as much as the “enthusiastic” voices does. There seem to be a lack of reality understanding, and although this so-called reality might include a range of risks to asset, companies and researches tend to push towards greater development to create Big Data type of services that would result in high benefits. The investment stage whereby companies, network, platform and application suppliers position themselves on the value-chain to sustain a later full roll-out, is well underway, which rises the initial grade to 2.2.

 

Key market trends impact: When Big Data misses Big Data

Below is a trend-mapping analysis weighing the information impact and its correlation with Hadoop developments and market rise. It is based on a direct/indirect impact, positive/negative impact that enables to assess a relative weight in context. Information was collected from September 2014 to October 2014 through WAI Networks, and sources are listed below the graph.

MAA - Market trends Impact Analysis

MAA – Market trends Impact Analysis

 

  1. Olivier Chicheportiche, ZDNet: Cost of cyber-attacks on French companies have risen by 20.5% over a year, 9.3% in the US, 200% in 5yrs. US costs: $12.7m per company per year
  2. Bob Violino, Information Management: “BI Survey 14, BARC’s annual survey of more than 3,000 BI professionals worldwide, shows that 30% of BI users now consider themselves “power users,” higher than the previously assumed 20%.”
  3. Jason Davison, Smarter Computing Blog: “In a recent ITG paper, VSC was shown to have approximately 72 percent better Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) compared to competitive solutions in large multi-petabyte infrastructures.”
  4. Kerry Butters, XEN: “Jobs saw a huge 68% decline in results, Real estate fell by 63%, Movies dropped by 36%, Insurance saw an 11% decline “Pigeon is doing nothing to affect the quality of your traffic and is just giving you less of it,” wrote Adam Dorfman in a blog post.”
  5. Barry Jaruzelski, Innovation Excellence: “The rate of growth in innovation expenditures for the Global Innovation 1000 slowed sharply in 2014, to just 1.4 percent—the slowest rate of growth in the past 10 years for the 1,000 global companies that spent the most on R&D.”
  6. Serdar Yegulalp, InfoWorld: “One estimate puts its growth at nearly 60 percent year-over-year, with a market of $50 billion by 2020.”
  7. Timothy Prickett Morgan, Enterprise Tech: The sweet spot for initial deployments is a starter cluster that costs on the order of $150,000 to $250,000. By the standards of large shared memory systems or commercial data warehouses, this is not a lot of money. A Hadoop distribution, depending on the features, costs roughly $7,000 per node for a software license, but a data warehouse with a big relational database sitting on it can cost $40,000 per TB and an in-memory database costs even more than that.”
  8. Accenture: “they say that a lack of IT capability is their main impediment to setting up a dedicated claims analytics organization. (85% Insurance claims executives in Europe and Latin America).

Conclusion: The intermediate grade is lowered due to the lack of clearer proven market impact understanding of Big Data and Hadoop, which is mainly due to a careful approach to new development combined to a raising awareness of dysfunctions and limits of currently used strategies, tools and policies, carried unto new platforms. Although with indirect impact, the economic downturn now globalized and rise of security threats is preventing the core market to take ground and generate a first loop of the virtuous circle needed to spur Big Data. Strategies and development plans should take into account a tendency to “think twice” that might delay decision making for business stakeholders and put emphasis on messages shared with them which should reinsure and encourage new visions, new cultures to reach a Big Data and Hadoop sufficient level of readiness from market. This systemic lack of belief currently lowers the intermediate grade to 1.7.

 

Semantic Analysis: The power of enthusiasm

Below is a semantic analysis of “Hadoop”, listing and weighing all key words shared with the “Hadoop” term in articles shared on WAI networks from September to October 2014. It is based on a relative weight analyses in context and relates to sources as listed below the graph.

MAA - Semantic Analysis

MAA – Semantic Analysis

  1. Zach Taiji, Smart Data Collective: “In layman’s terms, Hadoop is a framework for creating and supporting big data and large scale processing applications – something that a traditional software isn’t able to do.”
  2. SAS Analytics: “With SAS Visual Analytics, organizations can seamlessly manipulate, analyze and view data of any size, helping them transform it into stronger customer relationships, increased sales and efficiency, even healthier patients”
  3. Greg Satell, Forbes: “Yet big data and technology are clearly revolutionizing marketing.”
  4. David S Linthicum, Cloud Cruiser: “Backing up a bit, enterprises move to hybrid- and multi-clouds for a variety of reasons:”
  5. Lauris Veips, Cloud Tweaks: “APIs or application programming interfaces of popular services are used by numerous startups to bring valuable services to the general public.”
  6. Paul DiMarzio, Smart Computing Blog: “Having an advanced Hadoop distribution on the mainframe is just part of the story; it’s also necessary to have a secure, easy to use, fast and low cost mechanism for populating System z Hadoop clusters with System z data.”
  7. Sharon Gaudin, Computer World: “I actually do think this is a valid concern and it’s really an interesting one. It’s a remote, far future danger but sometime we’re going to have to think about it. If we’re at all close to building these super-intelligent, powerful machines, we should absolutely stop and figure out what we’re doing.
  8. Timothy Prickett Morgan, Enterprise Tech: “But the fact remains that the actual installed base of Hadoop clusters remains a lot smaller than many might expect given the amount of innovation that is going on around the platform”
  9. CHRISTIAN LIENHARDT, Les Echos: “A partir d’un algorithme inédit prenant en compte 250 paramètres, Jérémy Wies, vingt-quatre ans, a élaboré un logiciel de gestion automatisée des flottes de véhicules pour le transport sanitaire.”
  10. Julien Bonnet, L’Usine Nouvelle: “Indétrônable depuis 10 ans, Apple termine à la première place et Google regagne aux dépens du coréen Samsung la deuxième place perdue l’an dernier.”
  11. John Ellett, Forbes: “We describe them as “digitally connected families that love to shop and demand great value.”
  12. Ryan Goldman, Wall Street Technology Association: “firms are now able to not only fulfill increasingly stringent regulatory demands without the capital burden of specialized systems, but also take on more advanced workloads and realize new strategic benefits from the same data that they need to keep on-hand for compliance reporting.”

Conclusion: The final grade is largely supported by an overall shared enthusiasm about the assumed benefits of Hadoop use in companies. Although some constraints and reluctancy to create more systemic challenges, potentially ending, remain present in the overall conversation, the business benefits and operational efficiency as presented by analysts and experts currently offset the “pessimistic” views. The need for better prevalent models and contingency plans proving there is a secure model to roll-out for sustainable growth is at its paradigm, with words such as “danger” continuing to accompany the “value, benefits, seamless” positive attributes which make up for the vast majority of positive terms. The overall enthusiasm communicated by innovators therefore rises the final grade to 2.9.

 

In the next few days we will analyse the business model maturity and infrastructure and support impact to conclude on the general Innovation Index for Hadoop.

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Posted in AI, Innovation Index, Statistics
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On The Go: “The Hungover Generation” – Raphaël Glucksmann

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On the go is your innovation story inspired from elsewhere. Raphaël Glucksmann, a French author, recently gave an interview to La Nouvelle Edition. In lights of the many social and ideological turmoils his generation is going through, he explains what, in his point of view, is the key missing element in our lost battle against reactionaries. The writer […]

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We Are Innovation because we are real

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Wondering in my new job and getting across new sources of innovation, it occurred to me how the innovation thoughts and speeches remain far from the hard facts of reality we all evolve in. I met some of my former co-workers and talked about big data. I also spent some time investigating the spread of big […]

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