“I am Charlie”

Charlie

WAI is saddened by the loss of several of the most brilliantly virulent French spirits. This blog firmly believes in freedom of speech. There are no words to tell the horror and shock. We follow the entire French nation in uniting behind Charlie Hebdo.

We Are Charlie

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Hadoop: On the rise, but how high?

Innovation Index - Hadoop

The Innovation Index analyses the market attractiveness, business model maturity and infrastructure and support impact of a given sector or technology. This is the first part of the new Innovation Index for Hadoop. It aims at analyzing Hadoop market attractiveness through facts, figures and key words analysis, as collected through WAI networks. The second part will evaluate infrastructure and support impact, and the last part will analyze business model maturity to come to a final index value. To know more, your can watch “The Internet of Things, of What, Exactly?“, an end-to-end Innovation Index from earlier this year.

Hard Facts Analysis: Hadoop between fiction and reality

Below is a pull-push fact analysis based on articles collected through WAI networks from September 2014 to October 2014. It is based on a relative weight analysis in context, and relates to facts as listed below the graph, with no specific order.

Hard Facts Analysis

Hard Facts Analysis

  1. Nick Bostrom, Live Science: Super Intelligence is a scary scenario for many users
  2. Derick Harris, GigaOm: NortonWorks develops purpose-built object store for Hadoop, developing its connectivity.
  3. Joe Panettieri, Information Management: Tata Communications, Horizons Ventures and Access Industries invest in Watson competitor
  4. YEVGENIY SVERDLIK, Data Centre Knowledge: Germany and Japan eyed by Data Centre real-estate giant Digital Realty
  5. Richi Jennings, Forbes: Cloud is primarily business driven value, with a technology flavor
  6. Todd Goldman, Informatica: Hadoop is reaching market critical mass
  7. Steven Saslow, Information Technology Group: Business people still have no idea what cloud means
  8. Lee Gomes, IEEE Spectrum: “The overeager adoption of big data is likely to result in catastrophes of analysis comparable to a national epidemic of collapsing bridges.”
  9. Mike Combs, Veristorm: “Customer-centric marketing practices will drive everything from how promotions are constructed to how stores are stocked, decorated, and sited.”

Conclusion: The initial grade reflects the overall uncertainty related to such a wide topic and market opportunity for Hadoop, as a core environment for Big Data. The fact that we hear “fearful” voices enlightens the earliness of the market, as much as the “enthusiastic” voices does. There seem to be a lack of reality understanding, and although this so-called reality might include a range of risks to asset, companies and researches tend to push towards greater development to create Big Data type of services that would result in high benefits. The investment stage whereby companies, network, platform and application suppliers position themselves on the value-chain to sustain a later full roll-out, is well underway, which rises the initial grade to 2.2.

 

Key market trends impact: When Big Data misses Big Data

Below is a trend-mapping analysis weighing the information impact and its correlation with Hadoop developments and market rise. It is based on a direct/indirect impact, positive/negative impact that enables to assess a relative weight in context. Information was collected from September 2014 to October 2014 through WAI Networks, and sources are listed below the graph.

MAA - Market trends Impact Analysis

MAA – Market trends Impact Analysis

 

  1. Olivier Chicheportiche, ZDNet: Cost of cyber-attacks on French companies have risen by 20.5% over a year, 9.3% in the US, 200% in 5yrs. US costs: $12.7m per company per year
  2. Bob Violino, Information Management: “BI Survey 14, BARC’s annual survey of more than 3,000 BI professionals worldwide, shows that 30% of BI users now consider themselves “power users,” higher than the previously assumed 20%.”
  3. Jason Davison, Smarter Computing Blog: “In a recent ITG paper, VSC was shown to have approximately 72 percent better Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) compared to competitive solutions in large multi-petabyte infrastructures.”
  4. Kerry Butters, XEN: “Jobs saw a huge 68% decline in results, Real estate fell by 63%, Movies dropped by 36%, Insurance saw an 11% decline “Pigeon is doing nothing to affect the quality of your traffic and is just giving you less of it,” wrote Adam Dorfman in a blog post.”
  5. Barry Jaruzelski, Innovation Excellence: “The rate of growth in innovation expenditures for the Global Innovation 1000 slowed sharply in 2014, to just 1.4 percent—the slowest rate of growth in the past 10 years for the 1,000 global companies that spent the most on R&D.”
  6. Serdar Yegulalp, InfoWorld: “One estimate puts its growth at nearly 60 percent year-over-year, with a market of $50 billion by 2020.”
  7. Timothy Prickett Morgan, Enterprise Tech: The sweet spot for initial deployments is a starter cluster that costs on the order of $150,000 to $250,000. By the standards of large shared memory systems or commercial data warehouses, this is not a lot of money. A Hadoop distribution, depending on the features, costs roughly $7,000 per node for a software license, but a data warehouse with a big relational database sitting on it can cost $40,000 per TB and an in-memory database costs even more than that.”
  8. Accenture: “they say that a lack of IT capability is their main impediment to setting up a dedicated claims analytics organization. (85% Insurance claims executives in Europe and Latin America).

Conclusion: The intermediate grade is lowered due to the lack of clearer proven market impact understanding of Big Data and Hadoop, which is mainly due to a careful approach to new development combined to a raising awareness of dysfunctions and limits of currently used strategies, tools and policies, carried unto new platforms. Although with indirect impact, the economic downturn now globalized and rise of security threats is preventing the core market to take ground and generate a first loop of the virtuous circle needed to spur Big Data. Strategies and development plans should take into account a tendency to “think twice” that might delay decision making for business stakeholders and put emphasis on messages shared with them which should reinsure and encourage new visions, new cultures to reach a Big Data and Hadoop sufficient level of readiness from market. This systemic lack of belief currently lowers the intermediate grade to 1.7.

 

Semantic Analysis: The power of enthusiasm

Below is a semantic analysis of “Hadoop”, listing and weighing all key words shared with the “Hadoop” term in articles shared on WAI networks from September to October 2014. It is based on a relative weight analyses in context and relates to sources as listed below the graph.

MAA - Semantic Analysis

MAA – Semantic Analysis

  1. Zach Taiji, Smart Data Collective: “In layman’s terms, Hadoop is a framework for creating and supporting big data and large scale processing applications – something that a traditional software isn’t able to do.”
  2. SAS Analytics: “With SAS Visual Analytics, organizations can seamlessly manipulate, analyze and view data of any size, helping them transform it into stronger customer relationships, increased sales and efficiency, even healthier patients”
  3. Greg Satell, Forbes: “Yet big data and technology are clearly revolutionizing marketing.”
  4. David S Linthicum, Cloud Cruiser: “Backing up a bit, enterprises move to hybrid- and multi-clouds for a variety of reasons:”
  5. Lauris Veips, Cloud Tweaks: “APIs or application programming interfaces of popular services are used by numerous startups to bring valuable services to the general public.”
  6. Paul DiMarzio, Smart Computing Blog: “Having an advanced Hadoop distribution on the mainframe is just part of the story; it’s also necessary to have a secure, easy to use, fast and low cost mechanism for populating System z Hadoop clusters with System z data.”
  7. Sharon Gaudin, Computer World: “I actually do think this is a valid concern and it’s really an interesting one. It’s a remote, far future danger but sometime we’re going to have to think about it. If we’re at all close to building these super-intelligent, powerful machines, we should absolutely stop and figure out what we’re doing.
  8. Timothy Prickett Morgan, Enterprise Tech: “But the fact remains that the actual installed base of Hadoop clusters remains a lot smaller than many might expect given the amount of innovation that is going on around the platform”
  9. CHRISTIAN LIENHARDT, Les Echos: “A partir d’un algorithme inédit prenant en compte 250 paramètres, Jérémy Wies, vingt-quatre ans, a élaboré un logiciel de gestion automatisée des flottes de véhicules pour le transport sanitaire.”
  10. Julien Bonnet, L’Usine Nouvelle: “Indétrônable depuis 10 ans, Apple termine à la première place et Google regagne aux dépens du coréen Samsung la deuxième place perdue l’an dernier.”
  11. John Ellett, Forbes: “We describe them as “digitally connected families that love to shop and demand great value.”
  12. Ryan Goldman, Wall Street Technology Association: “firms are now able to not only fulfill increasingly stringent regulatory demands without the capital burden of specialized systems, but also take on more advanced workloads and realize new strategic benefits from the same data that they need to keep on-hand for compliance reporting.”

Conclusion: The final grade is largely supported by an overall shared enthusiasm about the assumed benefits of Hadoop use in companies. Although some constraints and reluctancy to create more systemic challenges, potentially ending, remain present in the overall conversation, the business benefits and operational efficiency as presented by analysts and experts currently offset the “pessimistic” views. The need for better prevalent models and contingency plans proving there is a secure model to roll-out for sustainable growth is at its paradigm, with words such as “danger” continuing to accompany the “value, benefits, seamless” positive attributes which make up for the vast majority of positive terms. The overall enthusiasm communicated by innovators therefore rises the final grade to 2.9.

 

In the next few days we will analyse the business model maturity and infrastructure and support impact to conclude on the general Innovation Index for Hadoop.

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Posted in AI, Innovation Index, Statistics

Big Data Wave: volatile and vulnerable

Think L@b

Today the ThinkL@b tries to define further Vs to Big Data. The objective is to better articulate the dimensions of Big Data around topics that exceed the technical definition. The point is to compound Big Data with appropriate indicators. It could be an economic factor, an environmental one, a political one. It would vary according to biases: contextual, cognitive, unconscious ecosystem…

WAI: So let’s see, what have we got…

V for Vulnerable

V for Vulnerable

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Posted in Big Data, Digital Economy, Think L@b, Uncategorized

V, like Virtual

Think L@b

The Think L@b is on week-end. On virtual week-end, that is.

V, like Virtual

V, like Virtual

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Posted in Creativity, Society, Think L@b

Scientific poetry, the science of emotions

Scientific poetry

On The Go

On The Go is your innovation story inspired from elsewhere

A radio show from France Culture,  “Les nouveaux chemins de la connaissance“, recently explored a specific poetry that was developed in the early 1800s. Those poems were inspired by science. This movement attempts to provide sense to science through poetry. As the author invited on the show explains, scientific poetry was at that time considered a trend that would slowly disappear to let science reign over minds and eventually over the world. One of the poets quoted on the show caught my attention. Here is how Hughes Marchal introduces him:

“In 1800, Jacques Delille wrote “L’homme des champs, ou les Géorgiques Françaises”, a poem in which he intends to put man back in the nature he should observe to inspire change. In the midst of new science techniques that were taking place, including Buffon’s geology, Delille finds a new poetic material to express his view. He is one of the most renown writers of his time. His work consisted in spreading science with a different support, with rhymes. He is inspired by Voltaire’s and Diderot’s work for The Encyclopedia. In fact, Delille doesn’t write. He sings. He managed to translate Virgile’s work in French despite the high technicity of the original text. In “L’homme des champs”, Delille describes the happiness of those who live in the countryside. In his view, the pleasures of nature can only be heightened by the acquisition of knowledge. Through the entire poem, Delille intends to articulate Buffon’s theories of geology. He speaks of them with emotions, transforming the story of a grain of sand into the story of the world. This formulation aims at attracting the reader’s attention and generating an appetite for science. He was helped in his work by the world greatest scientists. He was later criticized for his classical view of poetry. Writers like Lamartine marked the supposedly end of the scientific poetry as developed by Delille. In fact, the poetic genre survived until late 1900s”.

Below is the poem extract in French followed by an English translation.

Mais sans quitter vos monts et vos vallons chéris,
Voyez d’un marbre usé le plus mince débris :
Quel riche monument ! De quelle grande histoire
Ses révolutions conservent la mémoire !

Composé des dépôts de l’empire animé,
Par la destruction ce marbre fut formé.
Pour créer les débris dont les eaux le pétrirent,
De générations quelles foules périrent !
Combien de temps sur lui l’océan a coulé !
Que de temps dans leur sein les vagues l’ont roulé !
En descendant des monts dans ses profonds abymes,
L’océan autrefois le laissa sur leurs cimes ;
L’orage dans les mers de nouveau le porta ;
De nouveau sur ses bords la mer le rejeta,
Le reprit, le rendit : ainsi, rongé par l’âge,
Il endura les vents et les flots et l’orage.
Enfin, de ces grands monts humble contemporain,
Ce marbre fut un roc, ce roc n’est plus qu’un grain ;
Mais, fils du temps, de l’air, de la terre et de l’onde,
L’histoire de ce grain est l’histoire du monde.

Source: Wikisource

From your cherished mountains and valleys,
Watch in the used marble the narrowest piece.
What a rich monument! What a great history
Is held by its revolutions as a memory!

Made up of living empire’s deposits,
By destruction itself this marble was molded;
To create the pieces for water to knead it
From many generations crowds had to perish!
Ocean flowed over it for ages!
How long did waves roll it from within!
Coming down from mounts into its deepest abyss,
Ocean once topped the heads of the hills,
Until storm brought it back to the sea,
And then back to the shore rejected it.
Took it back, gave it back: thus by age eroded,
It endured storms, flows and winds:
Finally, among these high contemporary mountains,
This marble once was rock, and now it is a grain.
But throughout time, air, rain and soil,
The story of this sand is the story of the world.

 

How can science be an engine to grow new poetry, and poetry used a means to spread science? Is it a question of words, or are the links rooted deeper, in a common belief that humans share languages to nourish knowledge and thoughts, eventually turning them into emotions, ideas, actions?

 

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Posted in Creativity, Diversity, Education, On the go, Society, Uncategorized, Why we are innovation

Think L@b: What would Google, Twitter and Facebook do in the same office?

Think L@b

WAI Office

 

WAI: Well guys, yesterday was quite a lazy day for me, didn’t feel like doing much… Probably the season.

 

Tweeter community: Don’t worry WAI, today we have plenty of tweets to warm you up. Seriously, so many people have joined the network with brilliant ideas. We like diversity here, and we find it’s an asset. Carla Gentry (@data_nerd) came up with this article from Data Science Central claiming: “Focusing on a diversity of data points can lead to even greater understanding and meaning and often prevent an illusion of reality (single data points are often incomplete and do not tell the entire story).”

 

Facebook community: Let us go with Data Science, you nerd. If you want something funny WAI, then that’s my job. Today Everything Brilliant shared this picture, attached to a an INC article on creativity. The picture is brilliant, don’t you think so?

INC: Amazingly Simple Tactics for Producing Better Ideas, Faster By Mark Miller

 

Twitter

TC: 1,045 nerds say “NO”, FC.

 

FC: Yeah yeah big TC… We know you like BIG stuff, BIG Data, BIG Science… Great. We get your point. See on Facebook people talk creativity, any kind of people, like Marketing Interactive. They mention Niklas Malmqvist, global art director at King Digital Entertainment, the company behind Candy Crush Saga. You know what he says? He says: “Smaller teams keep the mood between team members relaxed, where they feel the freedom to bring up even the craziest ideas.  At King, the size of the team depends on the stage of production which the game is at.” So us and our 118 creative folks really don’t need your thousand big tweets.

 

WAI: FC, TC, there’s no competition here, what we want is the right story. That picture is awesome. It reminds me of… I’ll say more about that later. How about you, Google+ Community, what did you find?

 

GC: It’s still a start for us, seems our community is a little less reactive than TC but we’re getting there. To be honest, it’s still much better than any FC growth rate lately…

 

FC: Get your first hundred GC, then you can compare…

 

GC: This is correct. Although you may be wrong about creativity. I stepped into very creative people on Google+ as well. Look at these pictures from Numerik.

Numerik

Also, it happens HBR just shared an article stating that “A handful of amateurs is unlikely to rival a team of experts. So if you’re planning to harness the crowd, make sure to get as many people involved as possible.” And their picture is like very, very funny.

 

TC: This is a great article indeed, I’ll tweet it right away.

GC: Thank you.

 

WAI: I love your discussions guys, you sound like a comments thread on privacy. That’s exactly the dynamic we need for the Global Discourse. I’m happy to have you all, data scientists, journalists, business experts, creative folks, entertaining folks, to start my work.

 

FC: Should we explain what it is all about?

 

TC: How about some suspense?

 

Google+

GC: Yes, let’s see how many we are at next meeting. I’m quite sure a lot more people want to talk innovation. I had 14 new people adding me in circles just in a week so…

 

WAI: Hey, looks like we have an agreement! See you all for a next tea-time break, brilliant networks. Until then, make sure you get the discussion going.

 

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Posted in Think L@b

Intentional Reading

Intentional reading

On The Go is your innovation story inspired from elsewhere.

Intentional Reading

Intentional Reading

A few days ago, a friend of mine took me through his analysis of an economist we both read. While I thought, from what I know about his background, his ideas, his behaviour and knowledge, that we would have pleasantly shared a common agreement with the author, I was stun to find out we completely disagreed on the core views of the economist. I first thought he must have missed a point, or be misinterpreting some of the key economics models explored by the author. Then I thought may be it was me. It then occurred to me, as I told my friend, “we must have had different conversations with the author”. In fact, we certainly have.

 

Chances are our life experiences play a major role in the analysis we both draw from our reading. Chances are the questions we seek to answer reading the same book diverge as much as the answer we will interpret from our “author-reader” very private discussion. Following a definite conscious and subconscious scheme which is completely different for each of us, I have been looking for tools and user cases where he may have sought a definition of an ideal society (or anything else). We read the same author, but our conclusions differ massively.

 

The disagreement was not really on the economic mechanics used or the assumptions. We did agree on the high level results of the analysis, which means we shared the same understanding of the book itself. What caused a discussion was the author standpoint. Was he criticizing, mocking, or shaking us up to trigger action? Having unalike expectations from our reading, analyzing the text with divergent questions and answers matrixes of our own, we certainly ended up having collected quite a different treasure. That said, I still much favor my treasure to his.


And he obviously preferred his to mine.
I do take a stand back when reading this author. An additional question is queued in my memory for our next reading-conversation on economy. My key take away from this is divergence enables healthier discussions and thinking, and moreover, to a certain extent it is necessary. I like Dionne Kasian-Lew’s way of presenting our connected minds in an online/offline mode. As she says, “The influence of technology, good and bad, is part of who we are right now. The self isn’t fixed, it’s constantly made and remade.” Connected thinking would there be like an on-going “author-reader” conversation, taken in different situations, read with even more diverging experiences. A culture in itself? This is what Vatsal Surti would like to share on Ideapod, a universal culture. As he says, “The place under our feet doesn’t define us anymore. Politics, as ideology, is losing its significance. Our ideas are on tumblr. A story can be anything.” Anything, he says. So anyone could get to influence anyone, anyone’s idea could change anyone’s views. On an on-going basis. Is this democracy? Are we all becoming our own think tanks, reading books, tweeting, liking sharing, blogging…? I like Mike Corak’s view on think tanks. In his own words, “Maybe we shouldn’t be so surprised that think tanks produce studies confirming their (sometimes hidden) biases. After all this is something we all do. We need to arm ourselves with this self-awareness. If we do, then we can also be more aware of the things in a think tank’s make-up that can help in judging its credibility, and also how public policy discussion should be structured to help promote a sincere exchange of facts and ideas.

 

Have a nice week-end,

J.R. Camp

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Posted in Change, Creativity, Diversity, On the go, Society, Why we are innovation
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