InnoGraph: Redefining leadership in the new innovation ecosystem

New Management Styles

InnoGraph is a visual representation of the innovation trends and information shared on specific topics. Because of the changes occurring in its operating environment, innovation is managed in different styles and techniques combination which allows managers themselves to adapt. Team working is given a new dimension with collaborative communication tools, and through that teams and projects are being granted a new power. This InnoGraph analyzes the new balance to be built between leaders, managers, team members and followers to develop new forms of innovation strategies able to adapt to a changing world. If you want to join the discussion, you can join us on Linkedin, Google+, Facebook, Twitter and Slideshare.

Virtualizing leadership: real limits and opportunities

Virtual Leadership Real Limits

Virtual Leadership Real Limits

As Nick Morgan explains in his article for HBR, influence works with four major components: the positional power, emotion, expertise and non verbal signals. Regarding this last point, the writer reminds how “That’s why phone conversations are nowhere near as satisfying as in-person encounters and why conference calls inevitably involve lots more interruptions, miscues, and cross-talking.  We’re not getting the signals we’re used to getting to help us know when the other person is ready to hand the conversational baton on to us, and vice-versa.” The virtuality of teams and project do not make humans and their limits, tools, virtual at all. As Ron Ashkenas reminds for HBR, “If the sponsor wants to take project sponsorship seriously, she should be clear about the commitment. Sponsoring a dozen different projects is a worthless proposition, since the executive won’t have the bandwidth to provide any meaningful support.” Because our limits are not virtual, they have real physical implications if not taken into account, as reminds Entreprendre. According to the article, the six ways to manage these limits are: “expressing ourselves, watching out for alarm rings, driving objective analysis, figuring out a set of solutions, getting specific training to manage time”.

Taken on a global business scale, you can easily imagine how management and leadership are turning into difficult exercises, especially when leaders and managers are asked to lead people they hardly meet, or even know. Existing techniques and tools do not apply anymore, and there comes the time for change. Consultants and experts such as Torben Rick advise several points to take into account in order to better drive change. As he writes on his blog, “”Successful execution of a growth strategy depends heavily on having a culture that drives high performance. Changing the culture, however, is daunting for any organization. Culture is deeply embedded in values, assumptions, behaviors, and attitudes.” These cultural changes have to take into account new basics that are going beyond the models that had been developed previously. As Doug and Polly White explain for Entrepreneur, “In the real world, the average employee is, well, average. The fact is that the average employee does need extrinsic motivation. The notion that you can remove motivation and people will continue to work hard, because they are intrinsically motivated ignores human nature.

Redefining leadership

Redefining Leadership

Redefining Leadership

Leadership therefore needs to better include human nature in its development. Benjamin Kessler reminds for Insead Knowledge that “Effective leadership performance hinges on the willingness to ask fundamental questions, absorb the answers, and act on them — which can’t be done if you’re fixated on just one side of the influence-expression binary.” According to Vivian Giang from Fast Company, “Everyone in your company, especially those in lower levels of the firm, needs to know exactly why decisions are being made because they’re the ones going out into the world and advocating your cause. They need to know what’s happening in the marketplace and social culture, and how their organization connects to all of this. For this to happen, transparency needs to be something that happens throughout the company.” In below video from INC, Tom Gimbell, CEO of Lasalle Network, explains how transparency leads to honesty and projects that share credits and accountability.

Suzanne Lucas from INC lists a number of reasons why we should identify, share and manage human limits in the interest of businesses and employers, and obviously, of employees.

In his article for Strategy and Business, Matt Palmquist describes the benefits of a diverse board. In his own words, ” Indeed, Fortune 500 firms with a traditional CEO but a diverse board were the most successful at innovating and establishing effective operational systems, which underlines the need to spread multiculturalism throughout the corporate hierarchy.” Boards are indeed heading towards improved structures and more efficient models, as Per-Ola Karlsson reminds for HBR. As she says, “The fact that succession rates are more universally aligned is a sign of continued globalization. Governance practices have been converging steadily since 2000, capital has become increasingly mobile, and senior leaders at the largest corporations find themselves, more and more, facing the same kinds of challenges and opportunities no matter where they are headquartered or where they do business.” Acknowledging improvements are important, as well as analyzing failures, as Omer Zahid reminds for DailyTimes. In his view, “Understanding the types of destructive behaviour can help a leader in his or her task to diminish its worst effects on others and, by understanding the costs of his or her own destructive behaviour, offer the insight required to lessen its most negative effects. A feature of leaders prone to destructive behaviour is a persistent failure to take responsibility for their own actions.” In order to admit, analyze, learn from lessons, change then grow, leaders develop different communication styles that explain how courage enhances leadership.

Global leadership and crowd-based leadership

Crowd Leadership

Crowd Leadership

As Kevin Petrie explains for TechCrunch, “all of us, businesses and consumers alike, have a role to play. And the businesses that invite their customers to engage in transparent data transactions will create outsized benefits on both sides of the trade“. With Big Data, IoT and wearable devices, the customer enters the heart of corporate strategies, and leadership needs to align. It also needs to align with a growing use of open innovation. As Farid Gueham explains for Trop Libre, “Open Innovation is a solution to communicate and enlarge companies visibility. Open innovation also enables to grow group performance. (…) It is a real talent program.” On top of connecting with the innovation ecosystem, leaders also need to meet new breeds of leaders that have been selected by “the crowd” through crowd funding. As Lydia Dishman reminds for Fast Company, “The next decade will be great for female entrepreneurs, as online platforms provide access to large networks of investors in an efficient process,” says Caldbeck, adding: “They are a clearly identifiable group that is benefiting from this transformation, but there are many others, including entrepreneurs in rural areas.

Leaders therefore need to think in broader terms and broader ways. There is no “one fits all” solution to develop one’s eyesight, but there are effective communication tools. As Heidi K. Gardner and Mark Mortensen remind for HBR, “The only way to combat these asymmetries (different understanding in different locations) is to work hard to counter them. Effective global collaborations have processes and procedures designed into them that force information sharing across sites.” In order to broaden their views, leaders may also be tempted to better use analytics and balance their intuitive and data-driven decision making. In his article for InfoWorld, James Kobielus opens conclusive questions to help leaders decide: “What’s the right decision: Let the bots rule or let humans throttle them? That’s not an issue you want the bots to decide. They’re not all-knowing. But ask yourself: Does your organization have humans with the wisdom and perspective necessary for gauging when the bots truly need to be reined in?”. Last but not least, leaders have to decide and drive towards what they think tomorrow’s innovation system could be. As Françoise Benhanoum explains in her article for Boursorama, “it is with no doubt with a new type of partnerships, one that enables a better connection between public authorities and private initiatives, that innovation is inclined to reveal talents and develop tomorrow’s economy.

 

 

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Posted in Change, Diversity, InnoGraph, Management

InnoMetrics: Europe goes to the board

Europe to the board

InnoMetrics is a strategic analysis highlighting key figures and numbers shared on WAI social networks. Today we look a the European Union as a business and economy area, the latest technological and social developments, the impact of politics and regulation. If you want to join the conversation, you can join and share your ideas with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+ and Slideshare.

The Grexit situation and the release of unemployment rates over the EU zone are placing Europe in the difficult position of gauging the priorities of firefighting and building a longer term environment to develop sustainable growth. In the midst of this challenge, analysts and experts share their views, whether inside or outside the European scope, of how Europe uses digital as a growth lever, how they manage to develop as a team and what are the outlook of a cooperative innovation policy for the EU.

A digitally driven business growth ?

Digitally Driven Growth

Digitally Driven Growth

Europe is embracing the digital economy, for a very good reason. As Alexandre Barth explains for Maddyness, “digital already represents 5,5% of French GDP and contributes to 25% of the annual growth”. There is a growth future in digital. The only step missing is to make it more concrete than virtual. There are a few reforms that need to take place first. The good news is: these reforms are underway, as reminds Jean Pisani-Ferry in his report “Rebalancing the governance of the euro area“. According to the author: “Never had Europe undertaken as many reforms in its history. Yet very few European leaders estimate that results of these reforms will be sufficient.” He mentions the “OHIO effect” (Own House In Order) as a remaining constraint to build a shared and sustainable growth across the euro zone.

Nevertheless, Europe takes a chance and has started to launch a number of start-ups now competing on a global level as the most creative and innovative. Etienne Portais reports for Maddyness on the Top 100 start-ups in France. As he writes, “it is about presenting a shortlist of startups with the potential to be a strategic partner for members of the Electronic Business Group (open innovation approach, business synergies, product and services co-development), but also allow these entrepreneurs to pitch their story to the next EBG general assembly”. The economic environment is not helping, not entirely. As Joschka Fischer reminds in his article for Project Syndicate, “The ineffectiveness of existing institutions and structures in the face of today’s threats is now jeopardizing the EU’s legitimacy, because Europe’s citizens are calling for solutions that the EU obviously is unable and partly unwilling to provide. One consequence is erosion of support for the EU among its member states’ electorates”.

But the figures shared by Eurostat bring a little light of hope, “Compared with March 2015, the number of persons unemployed decreased by 126 000 in the EU28 and by 130 000 in the euro area. Compared with April 2014, unemployment fell by 1.545 million in the EU28 and by 849 000 in the euro area”. Claude Fauquet from Les Echos comments: “over a year, unemployment has decreased in 22 out of 28 countries, and increased in 6 others, including France.” Katarina Pistor, on her article for the World Economic Forum, wonders: “The real question is what kind of European Union Greece’s creditors want: a “small” one, comprising only the countries that are prepared to live by their exacting standards, or a “big” one that heeds the Treaty of Rome’s call for “ever-closer union.”

Tackling social challenges as a team

Social challenges

Social challenges

European startups emerge as a growing growth lever. As Etienne Portais reveals in his article for Maddyness, “the first business accelerator supported by FrenchTech is leveling up by welcoming two new joiners in their startup portfolio of 13 companies”. In Spain, Madrid is preparing to welcome the fourth International Conference in Open Data in 2016. As D. Víctor Calvo-Sotelo Ibáñez-Martín explains, “this is the opportunity to highlight the value and potential benefits of Open Data for the economy as well as for citizens, and more specifically, the connection with the most relevant initiatives such as “Open/Smart Cities”. Valentin Weber reminds the critical role of the EU regarding cyber security. As he explains for Trop Libre, ” according to Patryk Paulak and Catherine Sheahan from EU Institute of research for security, Europe optimizes its chance to improve global security standards if it cooperates with the US, Singapore and South Korea, as these countries share the same security vision of the world“. An interesting article to read after recent revelations on US recordings of French Presidents mobile lines.

Behind those facts and aspirations, another question. In his article for HBR, Larry Downes tries to explain “how Europe can create its own Silicon Valley”. In his view, there are legal and regulation barriers to market which need to be adapted to enable more ideas to actually come to market. In the UK, Sophie Curtis reports the words of a Government Spokesperson about innovation plans. As mentioned in her article for The Telegraph, the UK is looking at many different plans to better develop innovation: “Last year we announced £67 million of funding to support British businesses and scientists to bridge the ‘valley of death’ that lies between research and the marketplace. This includes £50million to seven new areas of technology where Britain is well positioned to take a leading role in the future like 3D printing of human organs and better drugs. We are also investing in a network of catapult centres. These innovation centres, part funded by the Government, help businesses and researchers bring new products to commercialisation more quickly.” In the meantime, Europe takes action and starts considering the creation of a unitary patent system. As Joff Wild explains on I AM Media, “My sense is that people in Europe have not even begun to think through everything that the unitary patent system could deliver. There are going to be immediate gains for some, but over the medium to long term there will be opportunities for the continent to lead the way in exploring and then setting standards for issues of major importance in a global knowledge economy that is underpinned by R&D, invention and innovation.”

In Belgium, after banning it for a year, Brussels finally authorized the use of Uber services in the city. In the midst of a European wide legal turmoil of Uber and the sharing economy impact on legacy economy, Arne Van Balen comments for Board of Innovation that “Where Uber is a hip and trendy service, the established firms have experienced and safe drivers. Combine both of these and we will experience the rebirth of the taxi industry – one in which more people will use taxi services. The key to success is the participation of existing taxi drivers in the Uber service.” Ideas to better drive innovation on a community level are developing, including when it comes to improving the tools needed for more innovation. As Florin Zubascu and Eanna Kelly remark in Science Business, “The EU’s Horizon 2020 science programme, now a little over 15 months old, is ticking along well enough, academics and business leaders agree. Which is not to say there are no shortcomings, or as Sergio Bertolucci, CERN’s director for research and computing put it, “It’s good but could be better.”” In terms of education, European wide programmes also adapt and place youth unemployment at the heart of their strategy. As Manja Klemencic and Paul Ashwin explain in Inside Higher Ed, “Higher education is seen as one key pillar in Europe’s vision to fight unemployment among young people, preventing them from becoming a “lost generation” and source of social upheaval.”

Building cooperative innovation policies

Cooperative Innovation Policies

Cooperative Innovation Policies

Carlos Moedas, EU Commissionner for Research, Science and Innovation, provides guidelines moving forward in his speech for “Interdisciplinary cooperation” for the 65th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting. In his own words:

“It’s the key ingredient to success in the 21st century, just as it was the key ingredient nearly 200 years ago.

  • Without scientists working closely with policymakers,
  • Without openness and interdisciplinary methods,
  • Without women,
  • Without connecting science with the arts,
  • Without embracing the value of the industrious citizen, tinkering at her latest project.
  • Without open innovation, open science, openness to the world,

We risk missing out the huge potential this connected, modern age has to offer!”

As Janelle Nanos reports for Harvard Business School Alumni, Moedas also says ““The United States is a country where you are able to transform knowledge into products, and I think Europe needs more of that (…). The big objective of my tenure is to help Europe to be able to have an ecosystem where you can actually create the conditions for fundamental science and research to be transformed into real products and businesses that create jobs and growth.

Meanwhile, Catherine Stupp reminds on Euractiv.com that “Albrecht (German MEP – Greens) said of the remaining issues that need to be parsed out, “There are clearly differences, notably as regards the rights afforded to consumers and duties to be fulfilled by businesses. However, if we can engage in constructive and pragmatic negotiations, it should be possible to reach a compromise acceptable to both sides in that timeframe (before the end of 2015).” As a proof that Europe can work better as a community, Charlie Osborne explains for ZDNet how “The joint operation between Europol’s European Cybercrime Centre (EC3), Eurojust, and Italian, Spanish, Polish and UK law enforcement bodies took place on Wednesday (June 10th). The operation resulted in the arrest of 49 individuals suspected of being part of the cybercrime ring, which is believed to have stolen six million euros in a “very short time,” according to Europol.”

Europe indeed faces growing challenges in a rapidly changing economic system and need the adaptative drive to tackle them as a team. In below video, Nikos Chrysoloras and Eleni Chrepa from Bloomberg Business summarize the Grexit crisis and implications on EU as a community:

As another challenge, Les Echos reports on the recent Belgian privacy commission to sue Facebook as it estimates the Internet company is violating internet users rights by “illegally tracking them”. As Leonard Foeger writes for Reuters, “The European Commission opened a formal antitrust investigation into Amazon’s e-book business on Thursday, opening yet another front in mounting EU scrutiny of America’s global tech giants.”

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Posted in InnoMetrics, Change, Digital Economy

Innovate 2015: Innovation seen by Experts, Analysts and Medias

2015 innovation

InnoTrends is a market trend analysis broken down by segments to interpret needs and requirements by paying attention to semantic and sentiment beyond numbers and facts. This series on “Innovate 2015″ gathers the definition of innovation for this year as shared on WAI social networks by business schools, society, politics, business experts, science and technology experts. This new article provides a view of innovation for innovation experts, business consultants, business analysts and medias. If you want to join the discussion, you can follow and share your ideas with us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+ and SlideShare.

Innovation Experts

Innovation ExpertsOn this blog post for TED IDEAS, Seth Godin explains how “stealing ideas” can be beneficial for all. That is, when you give back the credit. As he writes, “The connection economy steps in just as the glory days of the industrial age begin to fade. The connection economy rewards coordination, sharing and trust. All three of which are built on our species’ unique ability to steal ideas.” In that respect, Alex Chenevier introduces a new innovation model for Innovation Excellence, aiming at combining both the internal and external knowledge, analyzed through a “know-how, know-what, know-why” spectrum to facilitate decision-making from boardrooms currently unable to tackle strategic transformations in line with their internal assets and market knowledge. As he explains, “Disruptive innovation methodology is a cognitive distance computation of the external, tacit and public of know “what” stretched by the why, and the “how.” The combining factors offer the opportunity to seize the exploration, maybe for the first time as found definite, quantifiable, measurable and therefore applicable in business language with the scientific equation of K³ey Performance Indicator℠.”

Beyond sharing ideas and knowledge more efficiently towards decision-making, lays the opportunity to actually share the decision. As Skip Prichard writes on his blog, “When others are involved, empowered and delegated the task of making decisions, everyone learns, people are more engaged and the organization begins to have a culture of deciding instead of just identifying problems to discuss endlessly.” Scott Roberts shares on LinkedIn how his passion for sports has helped him identify fundamental leadership principles in business that apply as much as in a sport championship. One of the examples he gives is the following: “While every team and company has its leaders that command the spotlight, it is important to reinforce how all roles serve the needs of the overall organization and enable its success.” Taken on a society level, these attitudes of sharing knowledge, decisions and success can lead to seeing the world differently, which is cruelly needed to help poorest cities of this world develop, as Aseem Inam explains for Policy Innovation: “In that way, even with their myriad problems, they are beautiful testaments to human ingenuity. It would serve us well to better understand these ancient, highly complex, and continuously evolving cities to better harness their true potential.”

Complexity is indeed beautiful to watch, and the ability to apprehend a complex world, including its uncertainty, is a growing necessary leadership skill. As Greg Satell writes for Digital Tonto, “Still, uncertainty is not a bug, but a feature of any system that is exposed to the real world.  Sooner or later, no matter what we do, it’s going to catch up with us.  So, in the end, we need to meet it head on.” Uncertainty is also what makes us more creative, challenging the unknown, finding ideas where none has ever found them. As Matt Zucker writes for Forbes, “What we mustn’t lose sight of, however, is the critical role of creativity in digital solutions and for enterprises that want to dramatically evolve. Creativity boldly wakes customers up to what they didn’t realize is possible, helps them pay closer attention and involves them more deeply in the business. Creativity helps differentiate, especially in a world of parity and commodity. Creativity creates value.

Business Consultants:

Research and Consulting FirmsTop Consultants remind how sustainability has reached a stage beyond image and reputation to now become a mainstream investment area. As they highlight, “Coming from an era in which environmental and social issues were mainly considered from a reputational risk management point of view, the recent KPMG-survey among 12 major European global banks found that banks believe potential business value can be gained from sustainability strategies.” On the same line, Strategy and Business comments on “Climate Shock, The economic consequences of a hotter planet” written by Gernot Wagner and Martin L. Weitzman. As Katie Fehrenbacher writes, “Given these odds, and considering the huge sums of money at stake, the authors point out that it makes supreme economic sense to invest substantially in addressing climate change in the near term.”

New tools enable a new collaborations to achieve higher goals. Software Advice reminds that “Everything you do at work (…) essentially contributes to “creating and nurturing the assets you have.” An asset can be as large as a project or as small a document, and its journey is the path it takes from creation to completion, and beyond”. They mention Social Collaboration Software as a solution to create value from shared knowledge. As Mike Baxter and Dirk Vater from Bain and Company explain in below video, banking industry has used the digital transformation to create strategies that mix both digital and physical assets and tools to create optimized channels to markets.

Inspiring models also encourage a shift in mindset, as Ernst & Young remarks: “Overall, our analysis suggests that inherent traits of successful family businesses that contribute to their long-term success also create an environment that’s more welcoming and conducive to the development of women leaders.” Cap Gemini also notes that “most IT departments have adopted transformation initiatives but many still fail to address user, IT and business needs at the same time.” In his article for Business Standard, Richard Recki suggests that “Higher purpose is the glue that binds people to an organisation. Organisations are defined by their people and people have emotions, which as leaders we must never forget. The sense of purpose is how you connect to that emotion, how you bring together people who share the values that the organisation holds dear.”

 

Press and Medias:

Press and MediasJim Edwards reminds for Business Insider that “the most infamous anecdotal indicators that you’re in a bubble is when people start rationalising the bubble by saying “it’s different this time” or “this time it’s different.” Evans (a Tech Analyst) isn’t literally saying “it’s different this time.” Rather, as his deck says, “it’s always different!”” Meanwhile, Uber continues to lead an impactful media strategy and imposes its own rules of game. As TX ZHUO notes for Entrepreneur, “In a few years, we’ll no longer debate the merits and dangers of the sharing economy. it will simply be a fact of life. Traditional businesses can fight it, but doing so means setting themselves up for a loss.

In above video highlighted by “L’Oeil de Links” from the French Canal Plus TV channel, the Internet is given a voice and expresses the void of being virtual in contrast with the tasteful experiences of reality. Real life breathes reality into innovation, and brings tangible impact in reality. As Brian O’Connor writes for INC, “The businesses that are winning today don’t think about data for data’s sake, they think about how to leverage it effectively and how it can be turned into better outcomes,” says Tobin, who cites Amazon as a brand that’s arrived at the smart data stage and is just now dabbling with smart design in productive ways.”

Medias themselves are starting to change, as they have understood long ago their business models were disrupted by the digital economy. To encourage more innovation, a French media company called StreetPress has launched a “media maker”, a contest by which innovative media entrepreneurs can be selected and coached in the view of producing more innovative formats to share information. Ziad Maalouf from l’Atelier des Médias explains how the selection will value the sense of citizenship in submitted propositions. As in many other industries, medias quite logically show they want to bring their readers and listeners closer to their core values, and help them develop messages that can be shared within worldwide communities, contributing to change.

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Posted in Creativity, Digital Economy, Diversity, InnoTrends

On the go: recipes for “good” innovation?

Being Good

On the go is your innovation story inspired from elsewhere.

Change necessitates new behaviors in order to develop human centered innovation. In the below radio show, “Le Téléphone Sonne”, from France Inter (in French), experts around Hélène Jouan try to define and analyse the possibility of being happy in the workplace. Is it linked to our value as a worker or to the workplace itself and its management? Do we have to be happy in the workplace (the answer provided being “yes”)? One of the radio listeners explains his recipe on the phone: he once was told that if he wanted to be happy at work, then he shouldn’t be working. He should do something that makes him happy and get paid for it. So he opened a restaurant and says “I spend my days cooking, and not working.” What do you spend your day doing instead of “working”?

A handful of happy workers have turned themselves into passion-driven entrepreneurs thanks to the Internet. In below article from Fast Company, Elizabeth Segran invites us to discover the story of Sara Charles, graphic designer, who uses “Etsy” as a way to reach what major companies would call “niche markets” and actually turn out to be Sara Charles’ market for her creations and style.

Now that we have the recipe and the tools, we miss a good goal. Can goodness be part of the objectives we set for corporate projects ? In her article for FastCoExist, Pat Christen introduces HopeLab, a company developing a video game to help kids fight cancer. Here is the recipe they followed to pursue their objectives:

  • “Identify the observable behavior you want to see in the world.
  • Mine existing research and talk to the people you hope to serve to understand the psychology that motivates or prevents that behavior.
  • Design technology to create an experience that changes the psychology to support the behavior you seek.
  • Test and evaluate to determine the consequences—both intended and unintended— of your work.”
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Posted in Change, Management, On the go

Legal and Environment: Beyond the emergency

Beyond Emergency

The Big Picture provides you with a PESTLE analysis for innovation based on articles shared on WAI social networks. These articles are meant to drive a high level innovation thinking for you to re-use as part of your daily innovation job. If you want to participate to the discussion, you can join us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+ and SlideShare. This article ends this new series of Big Pictures, covering Legal and Environment. You can also read Politics and Economics, and Society and Technology.

Legal: Adapting frameworks

In this new report for France Stratégie, Lionel Janin explains how a new fiscal framework could be created on an international level in order to lower the risks generated by the very specific needs of the digital economy. As the author points out, “such a fiscal system, based on an ad valorem tax generated by advertising and data collection, which are easier to locate, could potentially include dramatic risks.” The author suggests that a low tax level as well as a threshold would limit the privacy, inequality and social risks that could result of such a policy.

Resolving inequality issues also necessitates an industrial support. If the business models are changing, may be the framework also needs to adapt. As Balaji T S explains for Tech Mahindra, “A change in Regulatory setup is needed; one that looks comprehensively at the Digital Service Ecosystem rather than in narrow silo of telecom only. I feel that there is an urgent need to set up a Digital Services Regulatory authority.

On top of adapting financial and legal frameworks, experts also highlight the need for technological innovation that protects individuals. As Emma LLanso highlights for the Centre for Democracy and Technology, “Encrypted services provide human rights advocates, journalists, lawyers, doctors, clergy, and many others the type of confidentiality and integrity of communications that are essential to the work they do.  Encryption can also help individuals to circumvent network-level content filters that inspect traffic and block access based on keywords in the text”. On the same line, according to Matthew Heller from CFO, U.S. technology giants have written to Barack Obama so the administration better considers encryption for citizens data security. “Encryption “protects billions of people every day against countless threats,” according to the letter, and the Obama administration, faces a critical choice: Will it adopt policies that foster a global digital ecosystem that is more secure, or less? That choice may well define the future of the Internet in the 21st century.

In Europe, authorities worry about a French legal project opening secret services surveillance scope for using more “intrusive” technologies. As LCP explains, they fear that these new laws “especially endanger journalists protection to access information and therefore threatens their freedom of speech“.

For security, privacy, intellectual property issue, there seem a to be a key pre-requisite legal authorities around the world are still struggling with. This is about considering technology, society and business dynamics as a whole reshaping the entire system their laws need to protect. Open innovation in an open world requires a new approach that WE-Open Innovation describes for Intellectual Property Rights: “Finally, the exact answers to the parties’ concerns depend on: the nature of the Open Innovation project, the situation of the seeking company on IPRs, the nature of the end product and market, and on the technology provider’s situation.

Environment: Too late ?

James Dyke for the World Economic Forum sets the scene: “it is possible to have our cake and eat it: a decarbonising economy and recovery of biodiversity. Unfortunately all current indications are that humanity is closely following the trajectory of MESSAGE 8.5 (the worst case scenario for climate evolution): eat as much cake as you possibly can and to hell with the consequences.” Adario Strange from Mashable further enhances Barack Obama’s concern for global climate with below video where the U.S. President mentions “There’s no greater threat to our planet than climate change. Climate change can no longer be denied or ignored.”

We may be running out of time, but we’re not running out of ideas yet. Although distant, although at the idea stage, they prove we have plenty of solutions at hand to help indicators of climate change reach a more acceptable level than “MESSAGE8.5″ scenario. For example, Adele Peters from FastCoExist mentions a vertical farm that is about to be built in Jackson, Wyoming. As she concludes, “It’s a feel-good story, which is why so many people were partnering with us from the beginning,” says Yehia. The team plans to open the farm early next year and will harvest the first crops a few months later.” Some companies have spotted an opportunity to use Big Data as a tool to improve buildings energy efficiency. As Lauren Browning found out for UK Business Insider, “FirstFuel’s team of building engineers then examined that data, along with precise details on the power surge, pinpointing two large exhaust fans in the garage that were unnecessarily operating at full speed. Adjusting the fans’ setpoints to their original design levels contributed to the Reagan building saving $800,000 in one year. GSA’s overall savings, much of it in eliminating manpower auditing and monitoring costs, is $13 million, roughly 90% just in evaluation costs, across its 180 sites.

Yet the challenge is alarming. Joanna Roberts from HORIZON explains how “Extreme weather and a changing climate are presenting new threats to the safety of our fish, seafood and vegetables, according to European scientists who are working out how to keep our food safe to eat.”

In her poetic yet alarming report for M Le Monde, Corine Lesnes highlights California’s concerns as the states enters its fourth year without rain. The photographs she showcases visually translate both the physical and political droughts that have lead to this dramatic situation.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency summarizes the situation. As Ben Schiller from FastCoExist outlines, “The embattled federal agency makes the case that meeting climate change reduction targets isn’t so difficult at all—if states can truly embrace energy-efficiency programs.” In his article for The Guardian, Brandon Keim reminds that the U.S. administration is already taking action, that is putting money on the table. As he writes, “Most news reports focused on the money, and so did the White House. But arguably more important than the $4bn raised was the fine print: a new federal information source and new financing options for would-be investors.”

 

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Posted in The Big Picture, Legal and Environment

Innovation Index: Hadoop, the turning point

Innovation Index - Hadoop

You can now find the full Innovation Index for Hadoop: market attractiveness, business model maturity, infrastructure and support, in below presentation.

Key take aways

Market

There seem to be a lack of reality understanding, and although this so-called reality might include a range of risks to assess, companies and researches tend to push towards greater development to create Big Data type of services that would result in higher benefits.

Strategies and development plans should take into account a tendency to “think twice” that might delay decision making for business stakeholders and put emphasis on messages shared with them which should reinsure and encourage new visions, new cultures to reach a Big Data and Hadoop sufficient level of readiness from market.

The need for better prevalent models and contingency plans proving there is a secure model to roll-out for sustainable growth is at its paradigm, with words such as “danger” continuing to accompany the “value, benefits, seamless” positive attributes which make up for the vast majority of terms.

Business Model

Most actors currently positioned in selling and/or developing Hadoop based services have opted for an open and flexible strategy to market and supporting business models (open innovation and partnerships)

The key point to bear in mind is the disruptive impact of Hadoop related activities, breaking up the value chains and  putting usage, therefore humans, at the center of it.

With the rising opportunity of creating self-developed applications and services, to be used either or both internally and externally, a few question marks remain on the actual opportunity that could be shared on the value chain.

Infrastructure and support

Analysts question the ability of organizations to support the roll-out of such solutions given the lack of specialized resources able to build Hadoop based solutions and the difficulty they have to adapt to new governance models.

The radical changes implied by Big Data and Hadoop to enterprises are such that a complete unlearning and relearning process needs to take place throughout organizations.

Although still under definition for the greatest part, the legal framework is starting to take action and protect end-users.

Hadoop Innovation Index

Hadoop Innovation Index

Hadoop Innovation Index

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Posted in Big Data, Business Model Maturity, Innovation Index, IT Innovation, Management

We Are Innovation because we share

We Are Innovation because we share

Innovation comes from the interaction of two concepts: an idea and a need. It is, in essence, born from sharing. This on-going discussion enables those iterations that take concepts to tangible projects, and generates the appropriate framework for ideas to develop further, without being closed on narrow points of views that eventually mislead innovation. Customer inclusion has become a key trend in developing innovation, and there now exist a wide variety of tools to develop this inclusiveness.

In her book “Work Smarter with Social Media”, Alexandra Samuel explains how the digital world is enabling a better visibility of ideas and concepts, setting guidelines to properly use each of the social networks the Internet is currently offering, and tools to optimise them for companies. As she says, “From managing email to building a social media presence, making smart use of technology is essential to professional success in a digital world. ”

A better visibility leads to better readability, hence better informed service developments. Taken on a wider scale, this has the potential to generate new breadth of ideas, developed jointly with the communities they serve. As an example, Pritpal S. Tamber writes for the Stanford Social Innovation Review that “It’s time to question the assumption that outside expertise, ideas, technology, and resources that are often alien to our communities will bring health to us. It’s time to believe that our communities have—or can nurture—what it takes to create health.” Defining concepts and solutions takes a whole different sense when the definition is being shared by a community of sense, and sense of community.

Sharing is indeed creating more links between humans, rather than simply developing businesses and markets. In his article for Forbes, Henry Doss describes what is needed to reach a more humanly oriented innovation. In his view: “if we are to really understand and harness the power of innovation in systems, we must understand that its purpose should be expressed in terms related to happiness, integrity, fulfillment, and shared responsibilities, as much as ROI, or efficiency, or patents.  Because to the degree we focus on the latter elements of innovation — the so-called business measures — we will miss absolutely the very things we need be mindful of in human systems like economies.”

Ultimately, including a human interaction into conceptual innovation enables to continually challenge status quo and adapt to changing visions and needs. When team are clearly driven by shared challenges, they are able to take them through selection hurdles until they define the appropriate solutions, understanding why they need them and therefore setting the right culture of change around them. As Torben Rick explains on his blog, “People resist change that is imposed on them. But if they help define the changes, they will own them. Whenever an organization imposes new things on people there will be difficulties. Participation, involvement and open, early, full communication are the important factors.”

It has never been a better time to reiterate how human links and interactions are necessary to better drive innovation. In a world soon dictated by data and robots, there seem to be a need to remind what nature lays behind the digits and technologies, and what objective they serve. Innovation should not stick to creating better processes and margins, it should enable a better sharing environment to come up with the right ideas and tools to develop on the long-term, eventually leading to a better world rather than a better market. As analysts and specialists mentioned above remind, it is all about sharing this sense of community and enabling communities to innovate by sharing ideas, definitions and solutions as a team, using the social tools and technologies available to do so.

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Posted in Change, Creativity, Diversity, Social Innovation, Why we are innovation

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