Leading through change, politics and economics

Politics and Economics

The Big Picture is a PESTLE analysis taking you through the broader environment around innovation. Today, we cover Politics and Economics.

Politics : Looking for heroes

Looking for Heroes In an article from La Tribune, we interestingly learn that France is the first European nation in terms of start-up creation. As Delphine Cuny explains, French minister of economy stated that “we need to define a European digital strategy, unifying rules”. That may indeed be welcome, especially as on the other side of the Channel, Ofcom starts to plan IoT support. As Warwick Ashford explains for Computer Weekly, “Ofcom has pledged to work with the government, the information commissioner’s office, other regulators and industry to support the progress of IoT nationally and internationally.”

Innovation and technology hold other kinds of influence over politics. As Severin Carrell from The Guardian mentions, “Analysing live data on Google searches for the name Alex Salmond combined with commercial polling figures allowed the researchers to predict the yes vote would hit 45% – five days before that actual result in the referendum on 18 September.” Predictions on the one hand, uncertainties on the other hand. Ingrid Lunden writes in TechCrunch that “Still, at a time when companies like Google are getting scrutinized on other regulatory fronts and subsequently challenged in the public eye, a Google Tax will not be welcomed.”

Will innovation and technology ever help solving real political issues ? We can at least hope there is an intent. For the political issues are real, and they need more than predictable solutions. As AFP reminds in La Gazette des Communes, in France “discriminations slow down the economic integration of immigrants’ descendants, especially those from Africa.” On the other side of the Atlantic ocean, George Friedman reminds in Stratfor : “So a speech will be made. Obama and Netanyahu are supposed to dislike each other. Politicians are going to be elected and jockey for power. All of this is true, and none of it matters. What does matter is that the United States, regardless of who is president, has to develop a new strategy in the region.”

Economics : going round in circles

Going round in circlesThe New York Times shares a 3D view of the global economic situation, with an analysis of “The Yield Curve”. The outlook doesn’t look bright, especially in 3-D. As Jonathan Gebauer explains for The Social MS, “Startups get founded everywhere – but the money to start up simply isn’t available.” May be it is high time we explore new dimensions ? As Hitachi reminds, “The McKinsey Institute has calculated that shifting towards a circular economy could add $1 trillion to the global economy by 2025 and create 100,000 new jobs within the next five years – a significant reward for creating less ‘waste’ during work.” Kathryn Dill from Forbes interviewed Ben Parr, the author of “Captivology”. In his own words, “It’s not about capturing attention for just yourself, it’s about capturing attention for the great ideas, the great art, the great projects that you have. Everybody has some passion more people should see or notice.” More ideas, more money ? It depends on how we manage to structure the “more”. As Parag Khanna writes in Longitudes about the sharing economy, “these online platforms empower individuals, reduce transaction costs, and create a more inclusive economy. But their evolution is far from straightforward, and many such services will require careful regulation if they are to flourish – as protests and court rulings in Europe against Uber demonstrate.”

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Posted in Change, Digital Economy, Diversity, Politics and Economics, Social Innovation, The Big Picture

Hadoop: finding the right balance

Innovation Index - Hadoop

The Innovation Index analyses the market attractiveness, business model maturity and infrastructure and support impact of a given sector or technology. This is the second part of the new Innovation Index for Hadoop. It aims at analyzing Hadoop business model maturity. The first part of the analysis, covering market attractiveness, is available here. A last article will weigh the impact of infrastructure and support impact on Hadoop.

End-to-end model Analysis: off the ground.

Off The Ground

Off The Ground

1. “Tech-savvy individuals with bad intentions can manipulate people through big data, and foreign governments — including Russia, China, and North Korea — have notoriously used it to control their populations”. – Daniel Riedel, Wired

2. “While 34% of the respondents agree that analyzing data from diverse sources is the key issue driving them to consider Big Data, a mere 3% rate the analytical capabilities in their organization as world-class”. Shilpa Phnadis, Times of India

3. “Whilst I’m sure many will create efficiencies and perhaps build out some new services to stay ahead, history tells us, and my instinct says, that many are going to be knocked by new innovative business models that spring up around them.” – Derek du Preez, Diginomica

4. “while more than half of HR practitioners feel confident about using data and metrics to improve their department’s effectiveness, fewer than half said that they were able to draw insights from this data and communicate this to other people in the business.” Cath Everett, Personnel Today

5. “Amazon got there first with a commercial offering of MapReduce, and it has hosted millions of clusters since then, and is likely to expand its partnerships with distribution vendors beyond the already promising one with MapR”. – Merv Adrian, Gartner

6. “Generating immediate revenue from Big Data is a universal goal for most marketers – and DaaS makes this possible for businesses across any type of industry.” Larissa Bedgood, Smart Data Collective

7. “Opening up the API for Watson allows developers and IBM to work together to create a Watson ecosystem. This will give developers and clients access to build any app they want.” Chris Ciaccia, The Street

8. “Formulating a viable strategy and developing IoT solutions can be highly complex.” Justin Browne, GovTech

9. “Offering an interface which allows users to obtain and configure capacity, this allows for complete control over computing resources. The user can scroll capacity up and down as their computing requirements change and Amazon EC2 is offered on a pay as you use basis, only charging the user for the capacity that is used.” James Nunns, CBR Online

10. “70% of large organizations already purchase external data and 100% will do so by 2019 (…) Companies will double their investment in generating new and unique data.” Gil Press, Forbes

The problem of Hadoop supporting big data turns out to be its own solution. This universe of unknowns long to be analyzed and synchronized in business analytics strategies that disrupt beyond the vertical and horizontal models established so far. As a consequence, most actors currently positioned in selling and/or developing Hadoop based services have opted for an open and flexible strategy to market and supporting business models (open innovation and partnerships). Although at early stage, this tends to consolidate and normalise disruption as a way forward, which leaves a great part of uncertainty but shows players are addressing it positively. A shift in mindset ? That may well be. But that’s only a start. The current maturity of end-to-end business models for Hadoop is estimated at 2 out of 5.

Strategic initiatives impact : data on the table.

Strategic Initiatives Impact

Strategic Initiatives Impact

1. “A team of researchers from Stanford University and Google have released a paper highlighting a deep learning approach they say shows promise in the field of drug discovery.” GigaOm

2. “The Palo Alto-based company says the new certifications are aimed at accelerating Hadoop adoption in the enterprise – which is obviously where Hortonworks is focused in terms of future growth – by supporting key capabilities required of an enterprise data platform.” Natalie Gagliordi, ZDNet

3. “We can target more effective interventions in areas that historically relied on gut and intuition.  At the same time, they present an enormous challenge on how to exploit those to improve a company’s performance.” Manu Panga, Innovation Enterprise

4. ” Data Science is used to leverage eBay’s powerful infrastructure, services and massive amounts of commerce data, while protecting the privacy of eBay’s customers.” Vadim Kutsyy, Innovation Enterprise

5.”Much like its Hadoop counterparts, namely Hortonworks and Cloudera, MapR’s portfolio focuses on the enterprise. What sets MapR apart, however, is its range of proprietary features tailored to specific industries such as financial services, healthcare and telecommunications.” Natalie Gagliordi, ZDNet

6. “Surrounding their de facto Big Data leader — both metaphorically and otherwise — the forces of Hortonworks, Teradata, SAS, and IBM announced the Open Data Platform, a consortium of sponsors (gold and platinum) who will rally around a “core” offering of Hadoop.” Eric Kavanagh, LinkedIn

7. “Looking forward, IBM plans to spend $4 billion to invest in the new areas of focus like data analytics and cloud computing, excluding acquisitions.” Syndication, CIO today

8. “Data is a strategy – and we need to start thinking about it as one. It should adhere to the same competitive standards as other business strategies. Data monopolists’ ability to block competitors from entering the market is not markedly different from that of the oil monopolist Standard Oil or the railroad monopolist Northern Securities Company.” Kira Radinsky, HBR Blog

9. “The Apache HBase community has released Apache HBase 1.0.0. Seven years in the making, it marks a major milestone in the Apache HBase project’s development, offers some exciting features and new API’s without sacrificing stability, and is both on-wire and on-disk compatible with HBase 0.98.x.” Eniz Soztutar, HortonWorks

10. “SAP Predictive Analytics is designed to help bridge the skills gap by placing complex predictive capabilities in the hands of many more users.” Katherine Noize, Computer World

The intensity of Hadoop related articles is representative of the numerous initiatives and different approaches for players to position themselves on the Big Data chess board. As mentioned above, the key point to bear in mind is the disruptive impact of Hadoop related activities, breaking up the value chains and  putting usage, therefore humans, at the center of it. The scale of the opportunity is also reflected in the depth of the analysis brought up by specialists. They talk about saving the world, they talk about ending it. Economists foresee drastic changes, businesses dream about unlimited opportunities. This dynamic brings the intermediate Business Model Maturity rate to 3.5 out of 5. 

The Business Case : all in ?

Business Case Impact

1. “Big data is fast becoming the hottest commodity in a contemporary gold rush, with anticipated global growth at a rate of 40% per year and businesses seeking new and innovative ways to commercialise it in their quest for competitive advantage.” Richard Blatchly, Shoosmiths

2. “It is estimated that 2.2 million terabytes of new data is created every day. To put this into perspective, that is roughly 128 million times more than the capacity of the average smart phone in your pocket!” Richard Blatchly, Shoosmiths

3. “the global hadoop market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 58.2% between 2013 and 2020. The market revenue was estimated to be $2.0 billion in 2013 and is expected to grow to $50.2 billion by 2020. Increase in demand for big data analytics is the major driver for this market.” Allied Market Research

4. ” Currently, services market is dominating with a market share of about 50% of the global Hadoop market due to growing necessity of data analysis in various organizations.” Allied Market Research

5. “In 2013, application software had generated the highest revenue of the overall global Hadoop software market. The main reason for this is the use of application software by developers to build applications for data analysis. Hadoop packaged software market is expect to grow at a CAGR of 62.9% during the forecast period.” Allied Market Research

6. “Looking at Oracle’s new license revenue makes this clear. For years the company’s new license revenue has hovered around 37% of total revenue.” Matt Asay, Tech Republic

7. “Analysts forecast the Global Hadoop-as-a-Service (HDaaS) market to grow at a CAGR of 84.81% over the period 2014-2019.” ReportsnReports, PRNewswire

8. “Over one third (37.8 percent) of US businesses have already invested in big data, ahead of Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA), which is at 26.8 percent; APAC, which is on 25.6 percent; and Latin America, which is at a distant fourth, with 17.8 percent.” Angus Mcaskill, ZDNet

9. “Industries furthest down the investment path are media and communications (35 percent have invested), banking (34 percent), and services (32 percent), while government (16 percent) and utilities (17 percent) are laggards.” Angus Mcaskill, ZDNet

10. “Expedia did not say how much its clusters would cost, however in 2013 the company told ComputerworldUK that the business spent over $500 million (£309 million) a year on its in-house technology.” Margi Murphy, Computer World UK

The business case for Hadoop is supporting the generally enthusiastic dynamics generated by the technology while reflecting some uncertainties surrounding business models. With massive yet segmented investments, businesses and investors are showing a candid interest in developing further Hadoop based services. With the rising opportunity of creating self-developed applications and services, to be used either or both internally and externally, a few question marks remain on the actual opportunity that could be shared on the value chain. The potential to market is so far too uncertain to bring further interest, therefore investments, into the play. The Business Case Impact for Hadoop brings the final Business Model Maturity rate to 3.3 out of 5.

 

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Posted in Big Data, Business Model Maturity, Digital Economy, Innovation Index

On The Go: “The Hungover Generation” – Raphaël Glucksmann

Better Ideas

On the go is your innovation story inspired from elsewhere.

Raphaël Glucksmann, a French author, recently gave an interview to La Nouvelle Edition. In lights of the many social and ideological turmoils his generation is going through, he explains what, in his point of view, is the key missing element in our lost battle against reactionaries. The writer argues that we actually miss ideas. Beyond the fact that we can agree or disagree on political statements, the author is astoundingly, almost bluntly describing the extremely painful and emotive context that has led to dramatic terrorists attacks in Paris on January 7th and the following days at Charlie Hebdo and in a casher store. With a distant yet pragmatic speech, he points to facts, rings alarms, describes the ideological mechanisms that have led the extreme right, among other, to win on the ideas ground. With a technical tone and a hopeful conniving gaze, he draws the mostly probable pessimistic future ahead of us. His statement for the present is difficult. We have failed. The darkest sides of our human ideas are winning the race on the political and cultural sides. His statement for the future is simple. We need to fight back. We need to fight with ideas, new ideas, new speech. It’s time to be constructive, it’s time to accept failure. It’s time to move on.

His book, “Génération gueule de bois“, is a proposal to create a common speech through the analysis of a generation that despite social, economic and cultural differences, is eager to innovate with ideas. As the author says, “the only issue we have is that our silent marches are still too speechless. What raised on January 11th is going to collapse if we remain unable to put words into our ideas.” He is asking for a new ideology to follow the citizen momentum generated by Paris terrorist attacks. It’s all about finding words to define it. His speech is a vivid request for the rise of new patterns of thinking that unite us. Regardless of the various cultural and social backgrounds we all evolve in, we cannot let anti-cultural and closed mindedness win the debate so easily.

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Posted in Change, Diversity, On the go, Why we are innovation

Data O’Clock

WAI Data OClock

Wearables and connected devices are the primary signs of an emerging connected culture which is developing massively across the globe. The stake is two-folded: the network and services part which allows an infinite upsell opportunities with the rise of dedicated applications, and the device part which opens ways for cross-sell and development of accessories. In the end, it all sounds like a known story. Haven’t we done the same with any other device, service or network?

Reality CheckSome claim wearables bring us closer to reality. As Christoph Mims from Nasdaq mentions, “The result, based on what I’ve seen, is technology that allows you to both communicate with and consume not merely the Web, but physical space.” Rian Mcaskill from mHealthIntelligence details Millenials close links to connected devices, and highlights: “millennials prefer to engage with their doctors through the latest technology. The study found that 60 percent of millennials support the use of telehealth options and 71 percent would like their doctor to use a mobile application.” Unfortunately, as Todd R. Weiss explains for eWeek, “When the Apple Watch hits the consumer market in April, the smartwatch will be missing previously touted key health-monitoring features due to problems getting the features to work and potential regulatory issues.” Our habits are getting mobile, but is the rest of the system following ?

RequirementsThere seem to be an exhaustive list of “No”. “There is a strong need for better education of developers and healthcare professionals on developing models of care that utilize the technology effectively,” mentions Katie Wike, for HealthIToutcomes. Ewan Spence from Forbes reminds another key buying crier for wearables: “Yes it will perform many of the same functions as the currently available smartwatches and fitness trackers in the $100-$200 price bracket, but in the same way that any Italian sports car can be used to pop down to the 7-11 for some more Irn-Bru to drink, the point of the Apple Watch is not necessarily about function. It’s about fashion.”

Risks

Risks

Truth is we do seem to be unprepared. Or at least underprepared for the data waves coming ahead. That may be because we forgot an important step with regards to wearables. As Kevin C. Tofel explains on GigaOm, “I’m not sure we’re any closer to knowing what we want from these wearable devices though, or rather if we’re at a point where smartwatches are compelling enough to generate hundreds of millions of sales. That’s partly why I wasn’t surprised to see reports of only 720,000 Android Wear devices shipped in 2014. There are other reasons of course: the first devices only started shipping in the middle of the year and the platform is brand new. But I think the central stumbling block to sales is convincing people that a smartwatch is worth buying.” On the other hand, we cannot deny wearables offer a wide opportunity for innovation, including for health services, as shows EyeMitra, a new health project lead by the MIT Lab.

Opportunities

Opportunities

Companies and industries are for sure placing bets and getting ready for the race. As Agence EP outlines on ZDNet, “Canonical (the editor of Ubuntu) has recently signed an agreement with Amazon and Microsoft enabling both Internet giants to publish more APIs for Ubuntu core.” According to Geoffray from ARUCO “Allianz France is launching an incubator programme dedicated to Big Data and connected devices”. “To take off in the long term, smart watches (or any other wearable) will have to provide a truly unique user experience, one that does more than just complement or replicate what’s already available on smartphones. This is the challenge for the wearables category as a whole right now”, remind Chris Vollmer and Matt Egol on Forbes.

There are reasons to be enthusiastic about the rise of wearables and connected devices. They for sure enable a simpler use of existing mobile technologies, while enabling a greater customization of usage, services developed in closer conjunctions with wearers’ needs. The only condition to that is making sure wearables receive and transmit information knowingly and purposely shared by consumers to transparent operators and service providers so consumers can retrieve value and benefits. Chances are we are building the model the other way around. 

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Posted in Big Data, Digital Economy, Market Roadmap

On the go : The world is WAI

We Are Innovation

Last year, you all have been an amazing source of inspiration. I’d like to hereby thank you all for that. There is no greatest reward for me than this WordPress picture showing views of this blog by country (over 2014):

The World is WAI

The World is WAI

I feel grateful for the energy we represent as one world to challenge all the many obstacles that surround us today to create better tomorrows. Innovation and ideas know no barriers or frontiers. Let’s make sure they hold a common belief that we can deliver a better world for generations to come.

You are Innovation, and thank you.

JRC

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Posted in Diversity, On the go, Why we are innovation

Innovate in 2015

WAI2015

Now a couple of months away from 2014, it’s time to have a look at what innovation is promised to be this year. This InnoTrends is relating science, business and technology experts view on innovation for 2015. A later article will look into schools, politics and society views. A last one will analyse press, consulting and analysis, innovation experts views for 2015.

Business Experts and Professional CommunitiesFalling in love with Big Data ?

On the Informatica blog, Murthy Mathiprakasam explains how “There’s a lot of talk about big data in the tech industry, but there isn’t a lot of understanding of how big data actually affects the real world“. As predicted for a now rather long time, the consumerisation of connected devices is altering human interactions. And it’s only just a start. Nick Sinai from Medium describes 2015 as the year of Chief Data Officers. As JOHN GREENOUGH explains for The Business Insider, “Now, the internet is expanding again — coming to all of the everyday devices found in our homes, businesses, and cities”. From a business point of view, this encourages SIMON GROS from Siècle Digital to explain how new business models will emerge from changing needs and priorities led by collaboration in 2015. And there is a crying need for change. Dana Sanchez from AFK Insider interviewed Harvey, CEO of PayGate from South African. Harvey says: “The sluggish job market in traditional corporates is driving a lot of young people to start their own businesses.” The good news is we are given a new set of tools to create solutions. And the people with it. Omar Akhtar from Altimeter Group mentions how “Facebook is comparable to a living room, with all your friends and relatives sitting in it, while YouTube is the public town square.”

 Science and Technology ExpertsA larger discussion going on

As Gartner mentions, ” about one in five vehicles on the road worldwide will have some form of wireless network connection by 2020, amounting to more than 250 million connected vehicles”. As Paul Miller from Gigaom remarks, “The adoption of cloud computing remains in a relatively early stage, and customers are keeping their options open“. As part of the 25 technologies trends that will affect 2015, Brian Solis mentions on Linkedin :”Crowd capitalization accelerates disruption…everywhere”. Nicole Miskelly writes for Bobsguide that “2015 may also be the year that biometrics are more widely used.” Gartner also highlights a high growth in mobile usage in 2015, with mobile data rising by 59 % over the year. Hence new analytics trends impacting big data as a science as shared by Thor Olavsrud from CiteWorld :

Companies

The challenge ahead

Presenting French start-ups from the CES in La Vegas, Roxanne Gintz from L’ADN straights that  smaller, smarter, faster might be better for 2015. Better, and more beautiful ? Lindsay Kolowich from HubSpot has identified new graphic trends for visual content in 2015. If not more beautiful, why not more sensible ? Gerry Roman from Marketing Think claims that “Companies need to think about how to leverage their thought leadership by separating it into multiple formats like video, LinkedIn posts, blogs and infographics – to win at the social selling, social business or content marketing.” Mike 2.0 from Smart Data Collective explains how: “MSPs need to craft a roadmap, something that will guide them through every step in the process. This isn’t just common sense; it saves on plenty of time and resources the further into the strategy you go.” Maybe 2015 should also be a year of common sense ? Including when it requires to challenge existing rules, call them 2014 rules. As Carol Wilson from The New IP suggests: “We have repeatedly heard how network operators want to break down the traditional silos that exist within their organizations and develop more horizontal structures. The dev-ops model represents one way of doing that, while also enabling new services to come to market more quickly and new iterations of those services to be continually in development. Most operators already aspire to this approach but 2015 will be the year they begin to put it into motion.”

Business experts are already working towards developing new models and tools to enable a faster change. Science and Technology experts see this new year as eventful is terms of disruptive usage, technologies, raising expectations. Companies measure the challenge from an infrastructure, structure and systemic network point of views. If not a year of disruptive change, 2015 is for sure widely seen as a year of great hope. 

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Posted in Big Data, Change, InnoTrends, IT Innovation

We Are Innovation because we are real

Because we are real

Wondering in my new job and getting across new sources of innovation, it occurred to me how the innovation thoughts and speeches remain far from the hard facts of reality we all evolve in. I met some of my former co-workers and talked about big data. I also spent some time investigating the spread of big data in leading companies, talking to sales and consulting experts. They don’t hear big data in their day to day lives. They read it on news and marketing collaterals. What they face is big needs for simplicity, cost efficiency, and a greater connection to reality.

There has to be an ideal, though. I’ve often worked in these teams focused on ideals. And we’re asked to take a step back from reality so we can concentrate on building bridges between reality and ideal. I know we sound “marketing”. We’d take a customer need, analyse it from a market point of view, understand the impact on strategy, and launch a thousand programmes (I a am merely exaggerating) to finally support half a dozen projects that would give birth to one product launch, hopefully answering that market need. In the meantime, we’d have calculated the full EBITDA business case bringing us margin and delivering value to shareholders. We’d have set up processes to validate appetite to market. We’d have raised awareness and brought customers, people and their needs, on board. In the end, we define a complex equation that aims at creating efficient solutions for a market, which you can call customer, segment, pilot, stake holder… In the end, we are marketing.

Where do we draw a line between marketing, reality and innovation ? Maybe there doesn’t need to be any. If we’re all standing in one equation to answer needs, we’re not talking about linear, single dimension built type of solutions. We’re talking about real algorithms that alter reality by aggregating ideal and real facts to create the adequate solution. This isn’t answering a process, a shareholder, a customer, a partner need. This is answering all these needs and more. To me it sounds like a complex number definition : they have a real part and an imaginary part. We need to make sure the innovation work we develop is in deep relation with real need. A need that evolves, that is difficult to narrow down, that may be expressed in a thousand different ways. A human need.

Answers do not come out of the blue or out of business cases. They are are deeply anchored in the reality we face on a daily basis. “The marketing team talks innovation but my customer has no clue what they mean”. This is the type of daily reality we evolve in. Big Data should be used to close that gap, and not widen it. Innovation should be used to close that gap, and not widen it. The only way we have to humanize innovation is to develop it closer to its real roots, and make sure the innovation we talk about relates to a humanly expressed need.

We Are Innovation because we are Real

We Are Innovation because we are Real

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Posted in Change, Management, Why we are innovation
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Recent Posts: We Are Innovation

Leading through change, politics and economics

Leading through change, politics and economics

The Big Picture is a PESTLE analysis taking you through the broader environment around innovation. Today, we cover Politics and Economics. Politics : Looking for heroes In an article from La Tribune, we interestingly learn that France is the first European nation in terms of start-up creation. As Delphine Cuny explains, French minister of economy stated […]

Hadoop: finding the right balance

Hadoop: finding the right balance

The Innovation Index analyses the market attractiveness, business model maturity and infrastructure and support impact of a given sector or technology. This is the second part of the new Innovation Index for Hadoop. It aims at analyzing Hadoop business model maturity. The first part of the analysis, covering market attractiveness, is available here. A last article will […]

On The Go: “The Hungover Generation” – Raphaël Glucksmann

On The Go: “The Hungover Generation” – Raphaël Glucksmann

On the go is your innovation story inspired from elsewhere. Raphaël Glucksmann, a French author, recently gave an interview to La Nouvelle Edition. In lights of the many social and ideological turmoils his generation is going through, he explains what, in his point of view, is the key missing element in our lost battle against reactionaries. The writer […]

Data O’Clock

Data O’Clock

Wearables and connected devices are the primary signs of an emerging connected culture which is developing massively across the globe. The stake is two-folded: the network and services part which allows an infinite upsell opportunities with the rise of dedicated applications, and the device part which opens ways for cross-sell and development of accessories. In […]

On the go : The world is WAI

On the go : The world is WAI

Last year, you all have been an amazing source of inspiration. I’d like to hereby thank you all for that. There is no greatest reward for me than this WordPress picture showing views of this blog by country (over 2014): I feel grateful for the energy we represent as one world to challenge all the […]

Innovate in 2015

Innovate in 2015

Now a couple of months away from 2014, it’s time to have a look at what innovation is promised to be this year. This InnoTrends is relating science, business and technology experts view on innovation for 2015. A later article will look into schools, politics and society views. A last one will analyse press, consulting […]

We Are Innovation because we are real

We Are Innovation because we are real

Wondering in my new job and getting across new sources of innovation, it occurred to me how the innovation thoughts and speeches remain far from the hard facts of reality we all evolve in. I met some of my former co-workers and talked about big data. I also spent some time investigating the spread of big […]

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Hadoop: On the rise, but how high?

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Big Data Wave: volatile and vulnerable

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